Surname: Shea

Mr. and Mrs. John Shea

The Shea Family of Prairie du Rocher Illinois

John Shea, farmer, of Red Bud, Illinois, Rural Route #3, was born June 20, 1858, in Randolph County, near Prairie du Rocher. He attended the public school and then worked for his father, Michael Shea, until 1880, when he rented a farm near Prairie du Rocher, and in 1885, he moved to the present location, where he still resides. On September 25, 1883, he was united in the holy bonds of wedlock to Miss Katherine Faherty. Six children came to bless the family ties – two sons, William M. and Harry J.; four daughters, Mary C., Julia A., Ellen S.

Biography of Jeremiah Shea

One of our early pioneers, whose worthy labors have done much toward the development of the resources and the substantial progress of Malheur County, is named at the head of this article and he is eminently fitted to he accorded consideration in this volume of his County’s history, since he is a man of good standing, influential and prominent, has always been a progressive and patriotic citizen, is possessed of integrity and a stanch character and is held in high esteem by all of his fellows. Mr. Shea was born in Canada on March 31, 1847, and there he was

Biographical Sketch of Albert J. Shea

While the older members of the pioneer staff are retiring one by one, it is pleasant to note that there are younger men of courage and enterprise to take up the worthy labors of these estimable men, who opened this country for settlement, and to prosecute them with an untiring zeal and a sagacity that is sure to win in the battle of life. Among this wide awake class, we are con-strained to mention the subject of this article, who has made a name and place for himself in the ranks of the leading stockmen of Malheur County, being justly

Biography of Tim Shea

Perhaps no one business enterprise or industry indicates more clearly the commercial and social status of a town than its hotels. The wide-awake, enterprising villages and cities must have pleasant accommodations for visitors and traveling men, and the foreign public judges of a community by the entertainment afforded to the strangers. In this regard the Idaho Hotel, of which Mr. Shea is proprietor, is an index of the character and advantages of Silver City, for the hostelry will rank favorably with those of many a larger place, and its genial proprietor neglects nothing that can add to the comfort of