Surname: Marshall

Eleanor Blanche Todd Marshall of South Orange NJ

MARSHALL, Eleanor Blanche Todd9, (William N.8, Harvey M.7, Uel6, Oliver5, Abraham4, Jonah3, Samuel2, Christopher1) born Feb. 11, 1866, married Nov. 11, 1896, James, son of William D. and Anna B. (Turk) Marshall, who was born June 10, 1869. Both Mr. and Mrs. Marshall were born in Somers, N. Y., and in 1920 were living in South Orange, N. J. Children: I. Elizabeth Wilson, b. April 18, 1898. II. Boy, b. Oct. 15, 1900, d. Oct. 19, 1900. III. William Todd, b. Sept. 2, 1904, d. Jan. 1, 1905. IV. Eleanor, b. July 14, 1910.

Margaret Garner and Seven Others – Fugitive Slave Law

Of this recent and peculiarly painful case we give a somewhat detailed account, mainly taken from the Cincinnati papers of the day. About ten o’clock on Sunday, 27th January, 1856, a party of eight slaves – —two men, two women, and four children— – belonging to Archibald K. Gaines and John Marshall, of Richwood Station, Boone County, Kentucky, about sixteen miles from Covington, escaped from their owners. Three of the party are father, mother, and son, whose names are Simon, Mary, and Simon, Jr.; the others are Margaret, wife of Simon, Jr., and her four children. The three first are

Biography of William H. Marshall

The combination of human attributes which yields success in many fields, though a rare one, is embodied in the subject of this review. The drug business, manufacturing, stock raising, what ever he has turned his hand to, has given a balance on the right side of the ledger, so carefully has he studied and so well has he wrought. William H. Marshall was born April 23, 1851, in Warren County, Indiana. He was the youngest of eleven children, five of whom are still living. His father was Edward P. Marshall and his mother Ann (Kellam) Marshall, both being natives of

The Indian Asylum in Canton, South Dakota in 1905

Canton Asylum, 1910, List of Patients

In 1898, Congress passed a bill creating the only ‘Institution for Insane Indians’ in the United States. The Canton Indian Insane Asylum, South Dakota (sometimes called Hiawatha Insane Asylum) opened for the reception of patients in January, 1903. Many of the inmates were not mentally ill. Native Americans risked being confined in the asylum for alcoholism, opposing government or business interests, or for being culturally misunderstood. A 1927 investigation conducted by the Bureau of Indian Affairs determined that a large number of patients showed no signs of mental illness. The asylum was closed in 1934. While open, more than 350

Rough Riders

Rough Riders

Compiled military service records for 1,235 Rough Riders, including Teddy Roosevelt have been digitized. The records include individual jackets which give the name, organization, and rank of each soldier. They contain cards on which information from original records relating to the military service of the individual has been copied. Included in the main jacket are carded medical records, other documents which give personal information, and the description of the record from which the information was obtained.

Biography of Daniel B. Marshall

Daniel B. Marshall, assistant cashier of the Saline Valley Bank at Lincoln, represents a family that had been identified with this section of Kansas for a great many years and is at once one of the wealthiest and most influential in Lincoln County. Abram Marshall, his father, is not only a banker, but had employed his means and energy in the development and upbuilding of the City of Lincoln and the agricultural interests of this part of the state. Abram Marshall was born on the Brandywine River in Chester County, Pennsylvania, in 1851. He belongs to some of the original

Biographical Sketch of David A. Marshall

David A. Marshall, born in Waterbury, Vt., came to Stowe at an early date, while yet a child, and remained here until his death, June 8, 1875, aged seventy-seven years. His widow resides with her daughter, on Maple street.

Biography of Col. Thomas A. Marshall

Col. Thomas A. Marshall, deceased, late of Charleston; was a son of Hon. Thos A. Marshall, a prominent lawyer, and for more than twenty years Judge of the Court of Appeals of Kentucky; he was born in Frankfort, Ky., Nov. 4, 1817; in early childhood, he removed with his parents to Paris, Bourbon Co., Ky.; his opportunities for obtaining an education were excellent and were appreciated and improved by him; he early became a student in Transylvania University, and, in about 1833, entered Kenyon College, but near the close of the Junior year, he left College, and was employed for

Biographical Sketch of Nathan R. Marshall

Nathan R. Marshall, the father of Mrs. Collins, was born in Hudson N.H., in 1792. He removed to Bible Hill when a boy of fourteen, and six years later married Abigail Hawks, daughter of Farrington and Sarah Knowlton Hawks. He was a man of education and an especially good accountant, as shown by his old account books, kept in a neat, clear hand. He held town offices at different periods, being a most intelligent and valued official. He and his wife reared ten children, three sons and seven daughters. Two of these died in infancy. Joshua P. Marshall, the eldest