Surname: Carver

1899 Middleboro and Lakeville Massachusetts Directory Cover

1899 Directory for Middleboro and Lakeville Massachusetts

Resident and business directory of Middleboro’ and Lakeville, Massachusetts, for 1899. Containing a complete resident, street and business directory, town officers, schools, societies, churches, post offices, notable events in American history, etc. Compiled and published by A. E. Foss & Co., Needham, Massachusetts. The following is an example of what you will find within the images of the directory: Sheedy John, laborer, bds. J. G. Norris’, 35 West Sheehan John B., grocery and variety store, 38 West, h. do. Sheehan Lizzie O., bds. T. B. Sheehan’s, 16 East Main Sheehan Lucy G. B., bds. T. B. Sheehan’s, 16 East Main

Portrait and Biographical Record of Seneca and Schuyler Counties New York

Portrait and Biographical Record of Seneca and Schuyler Counties, NY

In this volume will be found a record of many whose lives are worthy the imitation of coming generations. It tells how some, commencing life in poverty, by industry and economy have accumulated wealth. It tells how others, with limited advantages for securing an education, have become learned men and women, with an influence extending throughout the length and breadth of the land. It tells of men who have risen from the lower walks of life to eminence as statesmen, and whose names have become famous. It tells of those in every walk in life who have striven to succeed,

Boardman Family of Norwich Vermont

Samuel Borman emigrated from Devonshire or Somersetshire, England, in 1639, and settled in Wethersfield, Conn., in 1641, where he died in 1673. His name is identified with many official positions in the early history of the Colony. The following is a copy of an original letter to Samuel Borman from his mother, carefully preserved by William Boardman of Wethersfield, Conn., one of her seventh generation: “Obrydon, the 5th of February, 1641. “Good Sonne, I have received your letter; whereby I understand you are in good health, for which I give God thanks, as we are all. Praised be God for

The Abduction of Daniel Boone's Daughter by the Indians

Indian Captivity Narratives

This collection contains entire narratives of Indian captivity; that is to say, we have provided the reader the originals without the slightest abridgement. Some of these captivities provide little in way of customs and manners, except to display examples of the clandestine warfare Native Americans used to accomplish their means. In almost every case, there was a tug of war going on between principle government powers, French, American, British, and Spanish, and these powers used the natural prowess of the Indians to assist them in causing warfare upon American and Canadian settlers. There were definitely thousands of captivities, likely tens of thousands, as the active period of these Indian captivity narratives covers 150 years. Unfortunately, few have ever been put under a pen by the original captive, and as such, we have little first-hand details on their captivity. These you will find here, are only those with which were written by the captive or narrated to another who could write for them; you shall find in a later collection, a database of known captives, by name, location, and dates, and a narrative about their captivity along with factual sources. But that is for another time.

Narrative of the captivity of Alexander Henry, Esq – Indian Captivities

Narrative of the captivity of Alexander Henry, Esq., who, in the time of Pontiac’s War, fell into the hands of the Huron Indians. Detailing a faithful account of the capture of the Garrison of Michilimacki-Nac, and the massacre of about ninety people. Written by himself. 1Mr. Henry was an Indian trader in America for about sixteen years. He came to Canada with the army of General Amherst, and previous to his being made prisoner by the Indians experienced a variety of fortune. His narrative, as will be seen, is written with great candor as well as ability, and to the

Carver, George Washington – Obituary

George W. Carver Civil War Veteran Died Monday Night George W. Carver, died Monday night at the family residence, 209 South Pearl, from cancer of the bladder. Mr. Carver was born in Licking County, Ohio, June 15, 1840. He served three years in Company E. of the 94th Illinois during the Civil War and remove d to the Kittitas Valley in 1876. He had lived here since that time on the old homestead three and a half miles southeast of town until recently, when he moved to the present family residence. He is survived by his widow and six children,

Carver, Rosetta Curtis – Obituary

Mrs. G. Carver, Valley Pioneer, Expires Today. Resident here since 1876; passes at age of 77 after a long illness. Mrs. George W. Carver passed away at her home at 9 o’clock this morning [November 14, 1930] following a long illness and after being bedfast for more than three months, at the age of 77 years. Mrs. Carver was one of the earliest pioneers of the Kittitas Valley, coming here in 1876. Rosetta Curtis was born in Macomb County, Michigan, January 3, 1853. She was married to George W. Carver at Cottonwood Springs, Nebraska on March 6, 1869. Mrs. Carver

Armenia Todd Carver of Copake NY

CARVER, Armenia Todd9, (Wilbur8, Martin7, Abraham6, Abraham5, Abraham4, Jonah3, Samuel2, Christopher1) born Jan. 8, 1883, married Martin L. Carver, who is a Methodist Clergyman and was given a pastorate in Copake, N. Y. Child: I. Dewitt Clayton, b. April 7, 1912.

Carver, William Lyman – Obituary

Funeral rites have not been arranged for William L. Carver, about 75, Black Eagle, who died Thursday [September 18, 1947] at his home, 1915 Smelter Avenue. Carver was an early-day Montana cowboy and for many years was deputy sheriff and state stock inspector of Chouteau County. The body is at Croxford’s Mortuary. Carver was born in Klamath Co., Ore., and came to Montana in 1886. Survivors include seven children, Clarence Harold Peterson, a stepson, of Danvers, Mont.; Mrs. Pile Marcoff, Ashuelot, Mont.; Mrs. Rose Mosley, Glasgow; George W. Carver, Highwood; William J. Carver, Black Eagle; James L. Carver, Black Eagle,