Surname: Burwash

Migration of Families out of Norwich VT

At the first enumeration of the inhabitants of eastern Vermont, as made by the authority of New York in 1771, Norwich was found to be the most populous of all the towns of Windsor County, having forty families and 206 inhabitants. Windsor followed with 203, and Hartford was third with 190. The aggregate population of the county (ten towns reported) was then but 1,205, mostly confined to the first and second tiers of towns west of the Connecticut River. Twenty years later, in 1791, Hartland led all the towns of the county with 1,652 inhabitants, Woodstock and Windsor coming next

Norwich Vermont in the Revolutionary War

The sources of information in regard to the part taken by the town in the Revolutionary struggle are few and scanty. The earliest allusion in the town records to this important epoch of the country’s history is found in the election of a Committee of Safety at the annual town meeting, March 11, 1777. This committee was five in number: Deacon Joseph Smalley, Samuel Hutchinson, John Hatch, Captain Hezekiah Johnson and John Hopson. There is much reason to believe, however, that this was not the first Committee of Safety that acted for the town; but was a new committee selected

Biography of Prof. Nathaniel Burwash, A.M., S.T.D.

The subject of this biographical notice is a descendant of a United Empire Loyalist family that settled in Vermont, sometime before the American Revolution. Prior to that great historical event, his great grandfather was in the British navy. His grandfather, Adam Burwash, senior, moved from Vermont to Lower Canada, about 1790, and settled in the County of Argenteuil, where our subject was born July 25, 1839. His father, Adam Burwash, junior, was a volunteer in the rebellion of 1837-38, an uncle commanding the regiment, which was on garrison duty most of the time. When Nathaniel was ten years old the

Biography of Samuel L. Burwash

Samuel L. Burwash. It was more than half a century ago, when he was a small boy, that Samuel L. Burwash first knew Champaign County. He was identified during his active career with the agricultural element. It is in agriculture that Champaign County has found its greatest prosperity during this period. Mr. Burwash was not an unimportant factor in that development. He prospered as did all the other progressive farmers of his time, and in recent years has enjoyed the fruits of his earlier toil and is now living comfortably in Champaign. He was born in Eastern Canada, near Montreal,