Surname: Burke

Rough Riders

Rough Riders

Compiled military service records for 1,235 Rough Riders, including Teddy Roosevelt have been digitized. The records include individual jackets which give the name, organization, and rank of each soldier. They contain cards on which information from original records relating to the military service of the individual has been copied. Included in the main jacket are carded medical records, other documents which give personal information, and the description of the record from which the information was obtained.

Biographical Sketch of Simeon Burke

Simeon Burke, from Westminster, Vt., came to Stowe in March, 1800, and located upon the farm now owned by his son, Abisha, on road 8, where he resided until his death, at the age of eighty-two years. He married Miss Lucy Petty and reared a family of six children, only two of whom, Abisha and Alanson C., are living.

Biographical Sketch of Simeon Burke

Simeon Burke, from Westminster, Vt., came to Stowe in March, 1800, and located upon the farm now owned by his son, Abisha, on road 8, where he resided until his death, at the age of eighty-two years. He married Miss Lucy Petty and reared a family of six children, only two of whom, Abisha and Alanson C., are living.

Biography of Newton Burke

NEWTON BURKE was born in Connersville, Fayette County, Indiana, and died in July, 1907, He was a contractor, a vocation he continued to follow during the best years of his life, A veteran of the Civil war, he participated actively in a number of important engagements, and was honorably discharged at the close of his term of enlistment, after which he took up his abode in Anderson and here plied his trade up to the close of his long and useful life, His widow, who survives him, still resides in Anderson, and is now in the sixty-second year of her

1894 Hinckley Minnesota Forest Fire

1894 Hinckley Minnesota Forest Fire Deaths

The exact origin of the fire is somewhat indefinite; the one that visited Hinckley must have started in the region south of Mission Creek. Around this little village much of the pine had been cut. There was in the hamlet twenty-six houses, a schoolhouse, a small sawmill a general store, hotel and blacksmith shop. At the time of the fire there were seventy-three people living in, and adjacent to, this village; a great number of the population were away from home, having gone to Dakota for the harvest. The people had been fighting local fires for a month. At noon,