Surname: Boudinot

Biographical Sketch of Richard F. Boudinot

(See Grant, Watie and Adiar.)-Richard Fields, son of William Penn and Caroline M. (Fields) Boudinot, was born June 7, 1856. He married June 8, 1896, Mary Catherine, daughter of James Roe and Rachel Ann (Adair) Treppard, born August 28, 1873. They are the parents of Caroline Mary, born March 22, 1891; Elinor Margaret, born October 25, 1893; Harriet Gold, born November 25, 1897; William Penn, born Nov. 23, 1900; and Rachel Catharine, born Sept. 24, 1903. Mr. and Mrs. Boudinot are residents of Braggs, Okla.

Biography of Frank J. Boudinot

(See Watie, Grant and Ross)-Frank Josiah, son of William Penn and Caroline (Fields) Boudinot, was born August 20, 1866, in the Cherokee Nation. Educated in Bacone College or Indian University (near Muskogee), Flint High School (Michigan) and University of Michigan. He took a course in law at the University of Michigan in 1894-5-6. He is a member of the Knights of Pythias fraternity. His Cherokee name is Kaw-la-nah (Raven) and he belongs to the Cherokee Holly clan. He has been the attorney, counselor and adviser of the Kee-too-wah Society of Cherokees since 1899 and was elected Principal Chief of the

Biography of Elias P. Boudinot

The subject of this sketch was born January 2, 1854, the son of W. P. Boudinot, a poet and scholar, and brother of the late well-known E. C. Boudinot. Elias is a grandson of the celebrated Elias Boudinot, who was, perhaps, the most illustrious Cherokee of his day. He was almost a full blood, was educated at Cornwall, Connecticut, and there married Miss Harriet Gold, daughter of Rev. B. Gold, a Presbyterian minister, and president of the academy at Cornwall. An account of the tragical death of Elias Boudinot, Sr., will be found in the historical pages of this work.

1830 Map of Cherokee Territory in Georgia

Biographies of the Cherokee Indians

Whatever may be their origins in antiquity, the Cherokees are generally thought to be a Southeastern tribe, with roots in Georgia, North Carolina, and Tennessee, among other states, though many Cherokees are identified today with Oklahoma, to which they had been forcibly removed by treaty in the 1830s, or with the lands of the Eastern Band of Cherokees in western North Carolina. The largest of the so-called Five Civilized Tribes, which also included Choctaws, Chickasaws, Creeks, and Seminoles, the Cherokees were the first tribe to have a written language, and by 1820 they had even adopted a form of government