Alcott

Hardships of the Early Natchez Emigrants

Taking the reader with us, to the settlements of the distant Natchez region, he will find that emigrants continued to pour in, upon those fertile hills and alluvial bottoms, from all parts of “his majesty’s Atlantic plantations.” Many were the hardships and perils they encountered, in reaching this remote and comparatively uninhabited region. It is …

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Families of Ancient New Haven

The Families of Ancient New Haven compilation includes the families of the ancient town of New Haven, covering the present towns of New Haven, East Haven, North Haven, Hamden, Bethany, Woodbridge and West Haven. These families are brought down to the heads of families in the First Census (1790), and include the generation born about 1790 to 1800. Descendants in the male line who removed from this region are also given, if obtainable, to about 1800, unless they have been adequately set forth in published genealogies.

Phebe Todd Upson of Woodtick CT

UPSON, Phebe Todd7, (Bethuel6, Hezekiah5, Caleb4, Samuel3, Samuel2, Christopher1) married Martin, son of Timothy and Mary (Johnson) Upson. They lived in Woodtick, Conn. Children: I. Mary, b. Aug. 26, 1824, m. Upson Higgins. II. Anna Violetta, b. Feb. 11, 1826, m.(???)Alcott. III. Julina, b. April 11, 1828, m. Linus Kirk, of Whitneyville, Conn. IV. Clarissa …

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Weymouth ways and Weymouth people

Edward Hunt’s “Weymouth ways and Weymouth people: Reminiscences” takes the reader back in Weymouth Massachusetts past to the 1830s through the 1880s as he provides glimpses into the people of the community. These reminiscences were mostly printed in the Weymouth Gazette and provide a fair example of early New England village life as it occurred in the mid 1800s. Of specific interest to the genealogist will be the Hunt material scattered throughout, but most specifically 286-295, and of course, those lucky enough to have had somebody “remembered” by Edward.

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