Location: Winchester Kentucky

Montgomery Co., Ky

MONTGOMERY CO. (Gladys Robertson) In this community most of the slaves were kept on farms and each family was given a well constructed log house. They were fed by provisions given them by their white masters and they were plentiful. They were clothed by their masters. These clothes were made by the colored women under the direction and supervision of their mistress, the white woman cut the clothes for both men and women, and the colored women did the sewing of the garments. The men did the manual labor on the farm and the women the domestic. Each white woman

Clark Co., Ky

CLARK CO. (Mayme Nunnelley) The first records of Slaves in Clark County was given by a descendant of one of the members of the little band of resolute Revolutionary soldiers who had been comrades and mess mates throughout the long bloody war. These fifteen families, some from Virginia and others from Maryland, started westward in the early spring of 1783 for Kentucky. They bought with them some horses, a few cattle, thirty or forty slaves and a few necessary household articles. After many hardships and trials, borne heroically by both men and women, they halted on the banks of the

Slave Narrative of Peter Bruner

Interviewer: Evelyn McLemore Person Interviewed: Peter Bruner Date of Interview: 1936 Location: Kentucky Place of Birth: Winchester, Kentucky, Clark Co. Date of Birth: 1845 ESTILL CO. (Evelyn McLemore) Story of Peter Bruner, a former slave: Peter Bruner, was born in Winchester, Kentucky, Clark Co., in 1845. His master was John Bell Bruner, who at that time treated him fairly well. When Peter was 10 years of age his master brought him and his sister to Irvine. After arriving in Irvine, Peter’s master was very cruel to him. They got only cornbread, fat meat and water to eat. If his master’s

1710 Senex Map Portion

Shawnee Tribe

Formerly a leading tribe of South Carolina, Tennessee, Pennsylvania, and Ohio. By reason of the indefinite character of their name, their wandering habits, their connection with other tribes, and because of their interior position away from the traveled routes of early days, the Shawnee were long a stumbling block in the way of investigators.

Biographical Sketch of Ryon, W. M., Colonel

Mier Prisoner Colonel William M. Ryon, of Fort Bend County, one of the most gallant of the heroes known to Texas history, was born in Winchester, Kentucky, resided for several years in Alabama, and came to Texas in 1837, landing at the mouth of the Brazos, where he clerked, kept hotel, and followed various occupations for a time. In 1839 he was a member of a surveying party that laid off the town of Austin, the newly selected site for the seat of government of the Republic of Texas, and later went to Fort Bend County, and made that his