Location: Wichita Reservation

Wichita Tribe

Wichita Indians, Wichita  Confederacy. A confederacy of Caddoan stock, closely related linguistically to the Pawnee, and formerly ranging from about the middle Arkansas river, Kansas, southward to Brazos river, Texas, of which general region they appear to be the aborigines; antedating the Comanche, Kiowa, Mescaleros, and Siouan tribes. They now reside in Caddo County, west Oklahoma, within the limits of the former Wichita Reservation. The name Wichita, by which they are commonly known, is of uncertain origin and etymology. They call themselves Kitikiti’sh (Kirikirish), a name also of uncertain meaning, but probably, like so many proper tribal names, implying preeminent

Yatasi Tribe

Yatasi Indians. A tribe of the Caddo confederacy, closely affiliated in language with the Natchitoch. They are first spoken of by Tonti, who states that in 1690 their village was on Red river of Louisiana, north west of the Natchitoch, where they were living in company with the Natasi and Choye. Bienville and St Denys, during their Red river trip in 1701, made an alliance with the Yatasi and henceforward the tribe seems to have been true to the friendship then sealed. The road frequented by travelers from the Spanish province to the French settlements on Red River and at

Nabedache Tribe

One of the 12 or more tribe, of the Hasinai, or southern Caddo confederacy. They spoke the common language of the group. Their main village stood for a century or more 3 or 4 leagues west of Neches river and near Arroyo San Pedro

Eyeish Tribe

Eyeish Indians. A tribe of the Caddo confederacy which spoke a dialect, now practically extinct, very different from the dialects of the other tribes; hence it is probable they were part of an older confederacy which was incorporated in the Caddo when the latter became dominant. The early home of  the tribe was on Eyeish Creek between the Sabine and Neches rivers of Texas.  Moscoso led the troops through their country in 1542, encountering herds of buffalo. From the statements of Joutel and Douay, the Eyeish were not on good terms with the tribes west of them on the Trinity,

Anadarko Tribe

Anadarko Indians (from Nädä´ko, their own name). A tribe of the Caddo confederacy whose dialect was spoken by the Kadohadacho, Hainai and Adai.  The earliest mention of the people is in the relation of Biedma (1544); who writes that Moscoso in 1542 led his men during their southward march through a province that lay east of the Anadarko.  The territory occupied by the tribe was southwest of the Kadohadacho.  Their villages were scattered along Trinity and Brazos Rivers, Texas, higher up than those of the Hainai, and do not seem to have been visited so early as theirs by the

Caddo Geographical Location

The remnants of the Caddo confederacies of northwestern Louisiana and northeastern Texas settled in Oklahoma in 1859. After the Louisiana  Purchase when Louisiana bands joined their tribesmen in Texas all lived there peaceably until some White Texans determined upon an indiscriminate massacre of raiding Comanche and of all Reservation Indians. The Caddo escaped by a forced march of two weeks in midsummer to the banks of the Washita River. Of this period White Moon talked as follows: Comanche and Kiowa would raid, up to the Caddo villages. 1Weko, village The Texans trailed them and blamed the Caddo as well. The soldiers stood