Location: Webbers Falls Oklahoma

Biographical Sketch of Mrs. Lee Cook

Nannie, daughter of Clark and Lydia (Smith) Swimmer, was born in the Cherokee Nation. Educated in Cherokee National schools. Married at Webbers Falls in 1898 Lee Cook. They are the parents of: Andrew, who served three months in the World war; Glenn, and Evaline Cook. Mr. Cook is a farmer.

Biographical Sketch of Mrs. Emma Nora Gatlin

(See Grant and Oolootsa)-Emma Nora, daughter of Frank and May (Hanks) Rhomer, was born February 2, 1889, and educated at Webber Falls and the Cherokee National Female Seminary. She married Samuel Bell Maxey, son of James and Matilda (Yearby) Gatlin, born May 25, 1887. Mr. and Mrs. Gatlin are residents of Webbers Falls. James, son of James and Lucy (McCoy) Gatlin married Matilda Yearby and they the parents of Samuel Bell Maxey Gatlin. Calvin Jones Hanks married Emma Walker the daughter of John Lowery and Charlotte (Ratliff) McCoy, and they were the parents of May Rhomer.

Slave Narrative of R. C. Smith

Person Interviewed: R. C. Smith Occupation: Prophet One morning in May I heard a poor rebel say; “The federal’s a home guard Dat called me from home…” I wish I was a merchant And could write a fine hand, I’d write my love a letter So she would understand. I wish I had a drink of brandy, And a drink of wine, To drink wid dat sweet gal How I wish dat she was mine. If I had a drink of brandy No longer would I roam, I’d drink it wid dat gal of mine Dat wishes me back home.

Slave Narrative of Lucinda Vann

Place of Birth: Webbers Falls, Oklahoma Age: 92-100+ Yes, Sa. My name’s Lucinda Vann, I’ve been married twice but, that don’t make no difference. Indians wouldn’t allow their slaves to take their husband’s name. Oh, Lord, no. I don’t know how old I is; some folks say I’se ninety-two and some say I must be a hundred. I’se born across the river in the plantation of old Jim Vann in Webbers Falls, I’se born right in my marster and missus bed. Yes I was. You see, I’se one of them sudden cases. My mother, Betsy Vann, worked in the big

Slave Narrative of Morris Sheppard

Person Interviewed: Morris Sheppard Location: Fort Gibson, Oklahoma Date of Birth: November, 1852 Age: 85 Old Master tell me I was borned in November 1852, at de old home place about five miles east of Webbers Falls, mebbe kind of northeast, not far from de east bank of de Illinois River. Master’s name was Joe Sheppard, and he was a Cherokee Indian. Tall and slin and handsome. He had black eyes and mustache but his hair was iron gray, and everybody liked him because he was so good-natured and kind. I don’t remember old Mistress’ name. My mammy was a

Slave Narrative of Harriett Robinson

Person Interviewed: Harriet Robinson Location: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Place of Birth: Bastrop, Texas Date of Birth: September 1, 1842 Age: 95 I was born close to Webbers Falls, in the Canadian District of the Cherokee Nation, in the same year that my pappy was blowed up and killed in the big boat accident that killed my old Master. I never did see my daddy excepting when I was a baby and I only know what my mammy told me about him. He come from across the water when he was a little boy, and was grown when old Master Joseph

Slave Narrative of Betty Robertson

Person Interviewed: Betty Robertson Location: Fort Gibson, Oklahoma Age: 93 I was born close to Webbers Falls, in the Canadian District of the Cherokee Nation, in the same year that my pappy was blowed up and killed in the big boat accident that killed my old Master. I never did see my daddy excepting when I was a baby and I only know what my mammy told me about him. He come from across the water when he was a little boy, and was grown when old Master Joseph Vann bought him, so he never did learn to talk much

Slave Narrative of Phyllis Petite

Person Interviewed: Phyllis Petite Location: Fort Gibson, Oklahoma Place of Birth: Rusk County, Texas Age: 83 I was born in Rusk County, Texas, on a plantation about eight miles east of Belleview. There wasn’t no town where I was born, but they had a church. My mammy and pappy belonged to a part Cherokee named W. P. Thompson when I was born. He had kinfolks in the Cherokee Nation, and we all moved up here to a place on Fourteen-Mile Creek close to where Hulbert now is. ‘way before I was big enough to remember anything. Then, so I been

Biographical Sketch of Mrs. May Rhomer

See Grant and Oolootsa)-May, the daughter of Calvin Jones and Emma Walker (McCoy) Hanks, was born at Webbers Falls July 19, 1872; was educated at Webbers Falls and the Female Seminary. She married April 15, 1888, Frank Rhomer, born Jan. 6, 1863 in New Orleans, La. They are the parents of Emma Nora, born February 2, 1889; May Frances, born November 17, 1891; Margaret Bell, born April 2, 1894; and Fannie Charlotte Rhomer, born March 20, 1896. The Rhomers are farmers near Webbers Falls. Margaret Belle Rhomer married Robert Preston Vann, Jr. of Webbers Falls. Mr. Vann was killed in

Biography of O. H. P. Brewer

O. H. P. Brewer, member of the Muskogee county bar, who on the 8th of August, 1921, retired from the office of postmaster, having filled the position for eight years, has devoted no inconsiderable part of his life to public service and his labors have constituted an important force for public good. Mr. Brewer was born at Webbers Falls, in the Indian Territory, a little village situated twenty-five miles southeast of Muskogee. His parents were Cherokee citizens, who voluntarily removed from Georgia to the Indian Territory in 1838, in accordance with the terms of a congressional act. His father, O.