Location: Warren County MO

Biographical Sketch of Thomas Pratt

Thomas Pratt, of Culpepper County, Virginia, married a Miss Smith, by whom he had Thomas B., Elizabeth, and Ann. His first wife died, and he was married the second time to Martha Terrell, by whom he had Jonathan, Milton W., Lucinda, Mary, and Martha. Mr. Pratt settled in Warren County in 1831, with all of his children except Thomas B., and most of them now reside in that county.

Biographical Sketch of George Owings

George Owings, of Maryland, married a Miss Wells, by whom he had twelve children. He was married the second time, and had twelve children more. Two of his sons, John and Thomas, by his first wife, came to Missouri in 1816, and settled in Warren County. Thomas married Mary O’Brien, and moved to Illinois. John was in the war of 1812. He married Hattie McGarvey, by whom he had fifteen children James M., Richard, George W., David R., Joseph E., John B., Thomas, William H., Wesley, Rachel, Nancy, Julia, Maria, Eliza J., and Emily. All the children lived to be

Biographical Sketch of John Northcut

John Northcut, of Kentucky, married Jane Trimble, and settled on Charrette creek in 1820. He was an ardent Methodist, and used to exhort and preach in a style peculiar to himself. He had three daughters, and was very much opposed to their getting married. He was not willing for them to learn to write, lest they should send letters to their sweethearts; but they all contrived to get married in spite of his precautions. The names of his children were Elizabeth, George, John, Polly, Joseph E., Stemmons, and June. Elizabeth married Mr. Keithey, of St. Charles County. George married Kitty

Biographical Sketch of Mr. Ketchersides

Ketchersides. A man named Ketchersides, a cooper by trade, came from Tennessee at a very early date, and settled on Massey’s Creek in (now) Warren County. He remained only one year, when he sold out and returned to Tennessee. In about another year he made his appearance in Missouri again, but remained only a short time, when he went back to his old State. He continued in this way until his death, remaining in one State only so long as it was necessary to get money enough to take him back to the other.

Biographical Sketch of John Tice

John Tice, a German, and an uncle of the celebrated Prof. Tice, of St. Louis, settled in Warren County about 1809, and was the first settler on Pinckney Bottom. When the over flow of 1824 came he refused to leave his house, but moved his family upstairs and waited patiently for the water to subside. But in order to be prepared for escape in case of an emergency, he tied two meat troughs together to be used as a canoe. Some of his neighbors who had fled to the hills, became alarmed at the absence of Tice and his family,

Biographical Sketch of James Simpson

James Simpson was the owner of Simpson’s Ferry on the Kentucky River. He had a son named Erasmus, who married Mary Bartlett, of Virginia, and they had Fortes B., Elizabeth, Thomas, James W., Martha, William H. H., John L., Mary, Julia, and Jeptha D. Fortes B. settled in Warren County in 1828. Elizabeth married William B. King, and they settled in St. Charles County in 1830. Martha married Sidney S. Wood, who settled in St. Charles County in 1835. Julia married Joseph I. Carter, and settled in St. Charles County in. 1836.

Biographical Sketch of David Sherman

David Sherman, who was a millwright by trade, settled in Warren County in 1819. His wife’s maiden name was Margaret Root, and their children were David, William, Lucinda, Ira, Frank, Mary A., Charles, Electa M., and George W All these, except David, married and settled in Missouri.

Biographical Sketch of Lemuel Price

Lemuel Price, of North Carolina, settled on the Boone’s Lick road, near Camp Branch, in (now) Warren County, in 1815. He came to Missouri the year previous, but as the Indians were very troublesome at that time, he remained in one of the forts until the following year, when he erected his cabin at the place mentioned above. It was the first habitation erected on Camp Branch. Isaac VanBibber, Patrick Ewing, Boone Hays, and Lewis Jones assisted in raising the cabin. Mr. Price had eight children James, Lamb W., Parthena, Margaret, Miles, Job, Caroline, and Alfonso. James married and moved

Biographical Sketch of Parrish Langford

Parrish Langford married Sally Lawrence, of North Carolina, and they settled first in Virginia, from whence they re-moved to Smith Co., Tenn. They had five children William, Arthur, Jesse, Henry, and Moses. William, who was a soldier in the war of 1812, married Sally King, of South Carolina, and settled in Warren County in 1818. Their children were Elizabeth, Polly, Nancy, Sally A., Delila, Lawrence, Arthur, Joshua, Jesse, Richard W., John, William, and Henry. Nancy and Delila married and settled in Pike Co., Mo. Lawrence, Henry, Jesse, William, and Arthur married and settled in Warren County. Joshua settled in Lawrence

Biographical Sketch of Lawrence Long

Lawrence Long, of Culpepper Co., Va., settled in St. Louis Co., Mo., in 1797, and built a saw and grist mill. His children were Gabriel, John, William, James, Nicholas, Nancy, Sally, and Elizabeth. John married Rachel Zumwalt, by whom he had Lawrence and Andrew J. He died soon after, and in 1823 his widow and her two sons removed to Warren County, where she married Newton Howell. Lawrence married Malinda Hutchings, of St. Charles County. Andrew J. married Mary W. Preston of St. Charles County.