Location: Walpole New Hampshire

Lawton Slade

Slade Family of Somerset-Fall River, Massachusetts

For the past hundred years – during almost the lifetime, as it were, of Fall River and its entire industrial life – the name Slade has been continually identified with that industrial life and also prominent in other lines of effort in that great city of spindles. In 1812-13, when the real substantial pioneer establishments in the cloth making industry of Fall River were projected and completed – the Troy Cotton and Woolen Manufactory and the Fall River Manufactory – began the Slade name in this connection, Eber Slade of Somerset being one of the most prominent promoters of one of the corporations; he became its first treasurer and filled the position until in the middle twenties. William Slade of Somerset was one of the owners of the site of these first establishments, and was himself an original proprietor of the Pocasset and Watuppa Manufacturing Companies. The brothers Jonathan and William Lawton Slade were among the founders of the celebrated cotton mills of Fall River, both becoming presidents of the corporation. John Palmer Slade, another of Somerset’s sons, figured largely not only in the industrial life of the city but in other lines, becoming president of both the Shove and Laurel Lake Mills. George W. Slade, one of the “forty-niners” of the Pacific coast, was for full fifty years one of the extensive and wholesale merchants of Fall River and his name, too, is coupled with the city’s industrial life. And of younger generations one or more of the sons of some of these are at this time officially and otherwise connected with this industrial life and in other lines, notably Leonard N. and Everett N. Slade, of the firm of John P. Slade & Son, insurance and real estate; David F. Slade, member of the law firm of Slade & Borden; and Abbott E. Slade, now treasurer of the Laurel Lake Mills.

The Westport-Freetown-Fall River Massachusetts Tripp Family

The Tripp family first at Portsmouth, R. I., among the earliest inhabitants there, soon spread into the adjoining territory both in Rhode Island and Massachusetts, and in the march of civilization advanced with it until they became one of the numerous and substantial families of our country. Hon. John Tripp, the first American ancestor of the family in question, was one of the founders and proprietors of Portsmouth, R. I., 23d of 6th month, 1638. In the following is briefly considered a line of Tripps which descended through the settler’s son who located in Dartmouth, Mass., later generations settling in Westport, and a still later generation in Freetown and Fall River. It is with the special Westport-Freetown-Fall River family, the heads of which were Philip J. and Azariah S. Tripp, this article is to deal. These gentlemen were long substantial men and citizens of their respective communities, the former being a resident of Freetown, State senator and much respected citizen, and the latter especially prominent and useful, for years the cashier of the Metacomet National Bank from its inception, in 1853, for seventeen years a member of the school committee of Fall River, prominently identified with many of the manufacturing enterprises and at the time of his death president of the Fall River Savings Bank.

Phineas Wright Genealogy

Phinehas Wright of Hartford, Conn., m. Zilpha Cooper of Westmoreland, N. H., settled at Walpole and removed to Keene abt. 1796. Caleb2 Wright, son of Phinehas, b. Feb. 15, 1794, d. Keene, Nov. 21, 1869; m. Dec. 7, 1815, Sarah Reed, b. Surry, July 14, 1796, d. Keene, Nov. 16, 1838. Among their fifteen children, was: Calvin3, b. Keene, Mar. 13, 1816; d. Gilsum, Feb. 16, 1907; m. Diantha Leborveau of Keene, and had six children. Mr. and Mrs. Calvin Wright lived in S., on the Old Kemp or John Dunn place for a few years, and had born here:

Amos Wood Genealogy

1. Amos2 Wood, son of Joshua1 and Esther (Esty) Wood, was b. in Keene, June 16, 1794; d. Wilton, June 12, 1873; was a farmer and lived in Keene, Walpole and Wilton. He was a Deacon in the Congregational church of Walpole. He m. (1), Sept. 23, 1817, Fanny Seward, b. Sullivan, Nov. 13, 1794, d. Walpole, Sept. 19, 1848; dau. of Dea. Josiah and Sarah (Osgood) Seward of S. He m. (2), Mar 20, 1850. Pamelia Wightman, b. Walpole (?), 1795, d. there, Nov. 16, 1854; dau. of Israel and Frances (Allen) Wightman; m. (3), Apr. 16, 1858, Mrs.

Walpole, Cheshire County, New Hampshire History

THE early history of anyone town on Connecticut River only is repeated in the early settlements of others located in the same vicinity, in the manner in which families lived, and also in the dangers by which they were beset by hostile Indians. Town lines were no barriers to the friendship that one settlement had for another. There were prominent motives which the early settlers had for a pioneer life. One was to better their condition and make a name for themselves; and the other was to get away from the conventionalities of populous towns into an atmosphere of freedom,

Biographical Sketch of Jonathan Hemenway

Jonathan Hemenway, from Walpole, N. H., came to this town in 1800, and located on road 5, upon the farm now owned by O. A. Thomas. Two of his children are now living on the same road.