Location: Volusia County FL

Slave Narrative of “Prophet” John Henry Kemp

Interviewer: L. Rebecca Baker Person Interviewed: “Prophet” John Henry Kemp Location: Daytona Beach, Florida Age: 80 A long grey beard, a pair of piercing owl-like eyes and large bare feet, mark “Prophet” Kemp among the citizenry of Daytona Beach, Florida. The “Prophet”, christened John Henry–as nearly as he can remember–is an 80 year old ex-slave whose remininiscences of the past, delight all those who can prevail upon him to talk of his early life on the plantation of the section. “Prophet” Kemp does not talk only of the past, however, his conversation turns to the future; he believes himself to

Fresh Water Indians

Fresh Water Tribe (“Agna Dulce”) Indians. A name applied to the people of seven to nine neighboring towns, and for which there is no native equivalent. Fresh Water Connections. The same as Acuera (q. v.). Fresh Water Location. In the coast district of eastern Florida between St. Augustine and Cape Canaveral. Fresh Water Villages The following towns are given in this province extending from north to south, but not all of the native names have been preserved: Anacape, said to have been 20 leagues south of St. Augustine. Antonico, another possible name is Tunsa. Equale, location uncertain. Filache, location uncertain.

Utina Indians

Utina Indians or Timucua Indians. The first name, which probably refers to the chief and means “powerful,” is perhaps originally from uti, “earth,” while the second name, Timucua, is that from which the linguistic stock, or rather this Muskhogean subdivision of it, has received its name. Utina Connections. As given above. Utina Location. The territory of the Utina seems to have extended from the Suwannee to the St. Johns and even eastward of the latter, though some of the subdivisions given should be rated as independent tribes. (See Timucua under Georgia.) Utina Towns Laudonniere (1586) states that there were more

Acuera Indians

Acuera Tribe – Meaning unknown (acu signifies “and” and also “moon”). Acuera Connections. This tribe belonged to the Timucuan or Timuquanan linguistic division of the Muskhogean linguistic family. Acuera Location. Apparently about the headwaters of the Ocklawaha River. Acuera Towns. (See Utina.) Acuera History. The Acuera were first noted by De Soto in a letter written at Tampa Bay to the civil cabildo of Santiago de Cuba. According to information transmitted to him by his officer Baltazar de Gallegos, Acuera was “a large town where with much convenience we might winter,” but the Spaniards did not in fact pass through

Biographical Sketch of La Zell Tanney

Tanney, La Zell; attorney; born, West View, O., Oct. 8, 1862; son of LaCortes and Abbie E. Brooks Tanney; educated, Baldwin University, Berea, O., Oberlin College, Oberlin, O., graduated in law from Valparaiso, Ind.; with degree of LL. B.; married, Decatur, Ind., June 6, 1888, Cora Tricker; issue, one son, Leigh T. Tanney born Aug. 6, 1891; Cora Tricker Tanney died June 17, 1892; married, Lake Helen, Fla., May 6, 1894, Violetta Giddings; issue, one daughter, Florence M. Tanney, born Dec. 10, 1901, and died June 15, 1911; Violetta Giddings Tanney died in July, 1906; began the practice of law

Timucua Tribe

Timucua Tribe, Timucua Indians. The principal of the Timucuan tribes of Florida. The name is written Timucua or Timuqua by the Spaniards; Thimagoa by the French; Atimaco, Tomoco, etc., by the English. They seem to be identical with the people called Nukfalalgi or Nukfila by the Creeks, described by the latter as having once occupied the upper portion of the peninsula and as having been conquered, together with the Apalachee, Yamasee, and Calusa, by the Creeks. When first known to the French and Spanish, about 1565, the Timucua occupied the territory along middle St John River and about the present

History of Florida Indians

Most of the tribes considered hitherto had had very intimate relations with the Creek Confederacy, the central object of our investigation. We now come to peoples who remained for the most part distinct from the Creeks, but whose history nevertheless occupies an important place in the background of this study – first, because they were near neighbors and had dealings with them, usually of a hostile character, for a long period, and, secondly, because their country was later the home of the Seminole, an important Creek offshoot which must presently receive consideration. These were the ancient inhabitants of Florida. I

Yuchi Indians

Yuchi Tribe. Significance unknown, but perhaps, as suggested by Speck (1909), from a native word meaning “those far away,” or “at a distance,” though it is also possible that it is a variant of Ochesee or Oeese, which was applied by the Hitchiti and their allies to Indians speaking languages different from their own. Also called: Ani’-Yu’tsl, Cherokee name. Chiska, probably a Muskogee translation of the name of one of their bands. Hughchee, an early synonym. Round town people, a name given by the early English colonists. Rickohockans, signifying “cavelanders” (Hewitt, in Hodge, 1907), perhaps an early name for a

Volusia County Florida Cemetery Records

Florida Cemetery records are listed by county then name of cemetery within the Florida county. Most of these are complete indices at the time of transcription, however, in some cases we list the listing when it is only a partial listing. Volusia County Cemetery Records Hosted at Volusia County, Florida USGenWeb Archives Clifton Cemetery Clinton Cemetery Cone Cemetery Detwiler Park Dillard Family Cemetery Dummitt Gravesite Edgewater Cemetery Edgewater Cemetery Edgewater Cemetery Enterprise Evergreen Cemetery Friendship Cemetery Garfield Settlement Cemetery Glencoe-Geiger Cemetery Greenwood Cemetery Greenwood Cemetery Groover Cemetery Hillside Cemetery Hollywood Cemetery Lake Dias Cemetery Lake Helen & Cassadaga Cemetery Mt. Olive