Location: Tipton Missouri

Biography of William Alfred Clark, A. M., M. D.

It is seldom that one attains prominence along several lines, but Dr. William Alfred Clark of Jefferson City is regarded as one of the eminent surgeons of the state and in 1918 served as president of the Missouri state board of health, while in Masonic circles he has also been accorded a place of distinction and leadership, having been grand master of the order in Missouri in 1917 and 1918. He is numbered among Missouri’s native sons, his birth having occurred in Clarksburg, Moniteau county, September 11, 1865. He was the eldest of ten children, four sons and six daughters.

Biography of Thomas K. Tomson

Thomas K. Tomson. A life of more than ordinary fruitfulness and influence came to a close with the death of Thomas K. Tomson at his home in Dover, Shawnee County, November 2, 1910. He was one of the ante-bellum settlers of Kansas. In the fifty years of his residence in the state his name became widely known and respected and as a farmer and stockman he was one of the most successful in his section of the state. He was in his eighty-fifth year when death called him. He was born in Mahoning County, Ohio, September 25, 1826. He grew

Biography of Wilber A. Cochel, Prof.

Prof. Wilber A. Cochel. There is no doubt but that educational education means more to the United States today than any other kind of education and great institutions like the Kansas State Agricultural College are standard bearers in disseminating agricultural knowledge. This college management, with remarkable judgment, has gathered together a group of thoroughly trained instructors covering every phase of agriculture, the agriculture of modern progress. At the head of the animal husbandry division is found Prof. Wilber A. Coehel, a scholar and scientist whose name carries weight in many states of the Union on account of his discoveries and

Biography of George L. Atkeson

George L. Atkeson. To those parents who value the intellectual development of their children, it is a matter of vital importance that in the early and formative period of their lives, their instructors in the public schools should be thoroughly qualified for such responsibility in scholarly attainments and in personal character. In securing so widely known and so experienced an educator as George L. Atkeson as superintendent of their city schools, the good people of Altoona, Kansas, displayed exceptional wisdom. Intelligent public opinion here, as at other points, makes more insistent demands, asks for more decided results than in old