Location: Tippecanoe County IN

Alexander Seabury

Seabury Family of New Bedford, Massachusetts

SEABURY – variously spelled Sebury, Saberry, Saberrey and Sabury. The American ancestor of the Seaburys of New Bedford was (I) John Seabury, of Boston, who died before 1662. He married Grace, and had two sons – John (who went to Barbados) and Samuel (born Dec. 10, 1640) – and several daughters. (II) Samuel Seabury, son of John, born Dec. 10, 1640, died Aug. 5, 1681. He married at Weymouth Nov. 9, 1660, Patience Kemp, who died Oct. 29, 1676. He married (second) April 4, 1677, Martha Pabodie, daughter of William and Elizabeth (Alden) Pabodie and granddaughter of John and Priscilla

Biographical Sketch of Joseph S. Chenoweth

Joseph S. Chenoweth, the subject of this sketch, was born in Ross county,. Ohio, on the 18th of February, 1833. His father, Richard Chenoweth, was a native of Kentucky,. and a farmer; his mother’s maiden name was Elizabeth Smith, and she was a native of Maryland. They became the parents of eight children, of whom Joseph is the sixth, and when he attained the age of three years, they removed to Tippecanoe county, Indiana, and three years later to Missouri,. settling in Grundy county. There Joseph was reared and educated’, and there his father died in 1861, and his mother

Slave Narrative of John W. Fields

Interviewer: Cecil Miller Person Interviewed: John W. Fields Location: Lafayette, Indiana Place of Birth: Owensburg, KY Date of Birth: March 27, 1848 Age: 89 Place of Residence: N. 20th St., Lafayette, Indiana Cecil C. Miller Dist. #3 Tippecanoe Co. INTERVIEW WITH MR. JOHN W. FIELDS, EX-SLAVE OF CIVIL WAR PERIOD September 17, 1937 John W. Fields, 2120 North Twentieth Street, Lafayette, Indiana, now employed as a domestic by Judge Burnett is a typical example of a fine colored gentleman, who, despite his lowly birth and adverse circumstances, has labored and economized until he has acquired a respected place in his

Slave Narrative of John Fields

Interviewer: Cecil Miller Person Interviewed: John W. Fields Location: Lafayette, Indiana Place of Residence: 2120 N. 20th Street, Lafayette, Indiana Cecil Miller Dist. #3 Tipp. Co. [TR: Tippecanoe Co.] NEGRO FOLKLORE MR. JOHN FIELDS, EX-SLAVE 2120 N. 20th St. Lafayette, Indiana Mr. Fields says that all negro slaves were ardent believers in ghosts, supernatual powers, tokens and “signs.” The following story illustrates the point. “A turkey gobbler had mysteriously disappeared from one of the neighboring plantations and the local slaves were accused of commeting the fowl to a boiling pot. A slave convicted of theft was punished severly. As all

Biography of John Gallup

John Gallup, assistant treasurer of the Missouri Portland Cement Company comes to the Mississippi valley from New England, where the family has been represented since early colonial days. He was born in Mystic, Connecticut, December 14, 1844, son of John Gallup and Roxanna Fish. He received his education in the public schools of Mystic, Connecticut, and also studied under private tutors. After leaving school he gave special attention to accounting and later was associated with his father in the lumber business. In Mystic, Connecticut, October 5, 1870, Mr. Gallup was married to Ellen E. Noyes, daughter of George W. and

Biographical Sketch of Samuel L. Nolan

While now a well known figure in the public life of Sedgwick County as county treasurer, Samuel L. Nolan during nearly forty years of residence in the county had rendered his chief service as a business man. He had been a merchant, banker and manufacturer and is one of the big men in his section of the state. He was born at Lafayette, Indiana, March 7, 1862. In 1877, when he was fifteen years of age, his parents moved to Kansas, arriving at Wichita on the 17th of March in the same year. In the meantime he had attended school

Winnebago Indians

Winnebago Indians. The most ancient known habitat of this tribe was on the south side of Green Bay extending inland as far as Lake Winnebago. They also lived in the present states of Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, and South Dakota

Biography of Ira H. Dodson

Ira H. Dodson. Among the families that have been identified with Champaign County for more than half a century are the Dodsons, represented by Mr. Ira H. Dodson, who still has a portion of the old homestead in Urbana Township. Mr. Dodson was born in Tippecanoe County, Indiana, August 10, 1855,. a son of John and Elizabeth (McGee) Dodson. His father was born in Ohio and his mother in Indiana. In 1865 the Dodsons came to Illinois, locating in Urbana Township, where the father bought 192 acres of land. John and Elizabeth Dodson had two sons, Edward and Ira, and

Biogrphy of James C. McCaskrin

James C. McCaskrin. Of the families that have contributed much to the life and substance of Champaign County during passing years that of Mr. and Mrs. J. C. McCaskrin of Rantoul stand conspicuous. They came as young married people to Champaign County more than forty-five years ago. J. C. McCaskrin was a son of Harrison M. and Louisa E. McCaskrin, the former a native of Pennsylvania and the latter of Ohio. The mother’s family moved from Ohio to Indiana and entered a Government tract of land. Harrison McCaskrin was a miller by trade and followed that occupation in Tippecanoe County,

Biography of John F. Trotter

John F. Trotter. In early days the superiority of soil and climate attracted to Champaign County as permanent settlers many eastern thoughtful and observing pioneer home-seekers, and one of the families firmly established here bore the name of Trotter, a name that has been an honored one in the county ever since. A worthy representative is found in John Franklin Trotter, one of Newcomb Township’s most respected citizens. He was born in Tippecanoe County, Indiana, April 7, 1852. His parents were Hiram and Lydia A. (Alamang) Trotter. To them were born ten children and five of these survive, John Franklin,