Location: Snohomish Washington

Biographical Sketch of Sewall M. Knapp

SEWELL M. KNAPP. – Mr. Knapp is a native of Penobscot County, Maine, where he was born July 19, 1853. He was raised on a farm, and remained at home until he was twenty-three years of age. In August, 1875, he came to California, where he remained but a short time, when he left for Puget Sound, coming direct to Snohomish, finding employment at first in driving a team. Next he worked for about six years in the general merchandise stores of Blackman Brothers, after which he entered into the teaming business on his own account, starting a livery stable

Biographical Sketch of Ulmer Stinson

ULMER STINSON. – Mr. Stinson is among the most successful of the lumbermen of the Snohomish, and like the most of his compeers in this business is a native of Maine, having been born in Kennebec County in 1836. He lived, was educated and gained his business head in his native town, leaving it only at the age of twenty-seven. From his youth he was a lumberman and logger. But in 1863 he determined to try business upon a somewhat larger scale, and selected this coast as his field. He mined a year in Nevada county, California, but tiring of

Biographical Sketch of Dr. Henry A. Smith

DR. HENRY A. SMITH. – Doctor Smith was born in Wooster, Ohio, April 11, 1830, and is the son of Nicholas and Abagail (Teaff) Smith. His father, who was a Baptist minister, died when he wa but nine years of age, and left his mother a widow with eleven children, Henry being the youngest son. When he was about sixteen years old he moved with his mother and one sister to Mount Pleasant, Iowa. Soon afterwards he entered Alleghany College, Pennsylvania, and studied medicine. In the spring of 1852, in company with his mother and one sister, he started west

Biographical Sketch of Myron W. Packard

MYRON W. PACKARD. – This leading citizen of the lower Sound was born in Madrid, St. Lawrence County, New York, in 1830. At the age of twenty-three he left his native place, where he was in the mercantile business, coming as far west as Illinois, and in the same year journeyed on to River Falls, Wisconsin. That was his home for seventeen years, three of which were spent in the Union army, from which he was mustered out as a quartermaster-sergeant. In 1870 he came to Washington Territory, bringing his wife and family of five children, and located on White

Biography of Hon. Hiram D. Morgan

HON. HIRAM D. MORGAN. – This gentleman, whose portrait appears in this history, and who is so well known up and down the Sound, has had a varied pioneer life since 1853. He is a native of Ohio, having been born at Mount Ayre in 1822. During his boyhood, his parents moved to Marion and other portions of the state; and in the course of his development he learned the carpenter’s trade, which has ever been a great reliance to him. In 1846 he came out to Oskaloosa, Iowa, and in 1853 became one of the Davis party to cross

Noel, Clarissa Jane Farris – Obituary

Mrs. Clara J. Noel, 75, died Friday [October 9, 1942] at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Pauline Stalcup, 634 North Oakes Street [Tacoma]. She was a native of Fresno, Cal., and had been in Tacoma 12 years. She lived some years at Ellensburg and Snohomish. Her home was at 2603 ½ 6th Avenue. She was married Nov. 30, 1882 at Ellensburg to W. H. Noel who died in 1930. She was member of Glendale Camp Royal Neighbors in Tacoma and of the Epworth Methodist Church, Tacoma. Besides Mrs. Stalcup, she leaves daughters, Mrs. Myrtle Francis and Mrs. Stella Faithful

Ingersoll, Clara Gordon – Obituary

Mrs. E. D. Ingersoll, one of the oldest pioneers in this district and a long-time resident of the Colockum, died in Seattle this morning after an illness of several weeks. Clara Albertine Ingersoll, 78, was born March 16, 1863, at Island Gandmaner Province of New Brunswick, Dominion of Canada. She was married to E. D. Ingersoll in November of 1880, and came to the Pacific Coast , traveling by rail to San Francisco, and thence by boat to Seattle. They located at Snohomish and for many years farmed above Everett in the Snohomish Valley, and in 1895 located in Chelan

Vanishing Towns and Old Settlements of Washington

Of towns that once had the promise of a great future, Whatcom is one. It was named after a chief of the Nooksack, whose grave is a mile above the Bellingham Bay coal mine. For a short time during the Fraser River furore it had 10,000 people, and a fleet of vessels coming and going. The order of Douglas, turning traffic to Victoria, caused all the better portion of the buildings to be taken clown and removed thither. The single brick house erected by John Alexander remained, and was converted to the use of the county. Eldridge’s Sketch, MS., 31-2;

Biography of Isaac Cathcart

ISAAC CATHCART. – In the gentleman whose name heads this brief memoir, we have a leading and worthy citizen of Snohomish county. He is one of the men whose success in life has been mainly achieved in the county in which he now lives, by the exercise of economy, industry and business integrity, guided by intelligent financial ability. He is now in affluent circumstances, though twenty years ago he was a poor man. What he has came gradually through those years as the result of correct business calculations, and not by chance or the favorable turn of Fortune’s wheel. Mr.

Biographical Sketch of Arthur M. Blackman

ARTHUR M. BLACKMAN. – This young gentleman, a flourishing grocer of Snohomish, is a native of Penobscot county, Maine, and was born in 1865. While he was but a boy his parents went to Michigan, living at Bay City, and four years later brought him with them to California, making their residence at Oakland, and giving their son the benefit of the excellent educational advantages of that city. In 1885 he began to seek business of his own, and found employment with Blackman Brothers, at Snohomish. He made such good use of his earnings thus acquired as to be able,

Biographical Sketch of Levi H. Cyphers

LEVI H. CYPHERS. – Mr. Cyphers, who occupies a very prominent position in Snohomish county, having served as sheriff by the choice of the Republicans as well as democrats, is a native of the Keystone state, having been born in Monroe county, Pennsylvania, in 1849. He engaged in business at his early home, but at the age of twenty-six acted upon the belief that there were better opportunities for young men at the West. He accordingly set out for the Black Hills in the fall of 1875, with the expectation of digging gold, but, upon arriving at Cheyenne, found that

Biographical Sketch of Clark Ferguson

CLARK FERGUSON. – This gentleman was born in Putnam county, New York, October 13, 1835, and lived at his birthplace until the age of twenty. In April, 1855, he came with his brother Yates via the Nicaragua route to the land of gold, arriving in San Francisco in May. After two years of life in California, he returned to his Eastern home, but one year later again came west via the overland route. On reaching Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, and receiving the intelligence of the Mormon troubles, he located in that place, remaining two years. He then came to the mines

Biography of Hon. Emory C. Ferguson

HON. EMORY C. FERGUSON. – Mr. Ferguson, whose portrait is placed in this history, was born on a farm in Westchester county, New York, March 5, 1833, and is the son of Samuel S. and Maria (Haight) Ferguson. He resided in his native county and learned the trade of a carpenter until reaching his majority. April 5, 1854, he with his brother Yates (who came to California in 1849 and had returned East) started via the Isthmus of Panama for the Golden State, arriving in San Francisco in May. Our subject immediately proceeded to the mines on the middle fork

Biographical Sketch of Joseph Mallett

JOSEPH MALLETT. – The proprietor of the Penobscot Hotel, in Snohomish, Washington, indicates the place of his birth in the name of his house, Penobscot county, Maine, is his native place; and the year of his birth was 1855. At the age of twenty he came to the Pacific coast with a brother, and after a short stay in California continued the journey to the Sound, locating first in Tacoma, and after a few months finding employment at Port Gamble. At Snohomish he began by logging, and increased his means by clerking for Mr. Cathcart. Returning to the logging business