Location: Scotland

Knowles Family of New Bedford, MA

The family bearing this name in New Bedford, where it is one of nearly one hundred years’ standing one, too, of prominence and wealth, is a branch of the ancient Knowles family of the town of Eastham, Barnstable county, this Commonwealth. Reference is made to some of the descendants of the brothers Thomas and James H. Knowles of Eastham, several of whose sons – at least two of the former and one of the latter – in their earlier manhood cast their lot with the people of New Bedford. The firm of Thomas Knowles & Co. for many years was one of the greatest engaged in the whale fishery business in New Bedford; and its members in turn have been succeeded in business by younger generations who have most worthily worn the family name and sustained its reputation; and today the name continues of record in and about the city of their birth connected prominently with many of the most extensive commercial establishments and banking institutions of the locality.

Biographical Sketch of George W. Dickie

One of San Mateo County’s most distinguished citizens is George W. Dickie of San Mateo, marine architect and naval designer who drew the plans for the famous old battleship Oregon and a score of other vessels of the United States Navy. Mr. Dickie is known the world over as a designer of fighting craft. Perhaps his most famous work was the Oregon, “the bulldog of the American navy,” which at the time it was commissioned, was the most notable warship afloat. Other vessels that were designed by Mr. Dickie are the battleships Wisconsin and Ohio, the armored cruisers Colorado, South

Biographical Sketch of George Peery

George, William, and James Peery emigrated from Scotland and settled in Tazewell Co., Va. George married Martha Davidson, of Ireland, and they had three sons and nine daughters. Joseph, the youngest son, married Elizabeth Hall, of Virginia, and settled in Montgomery Co., Mo., in 1836. Their children were Charles, Albert G., Gordon C., Thomas, Andrew, William IL, Joseph A., and George. The members of the Peery family are a genial, hospitable people, and highly esteemed by their neighbors and acquaintances. Dr. Thomas Peery, who died in 1875, was especially distinguished for his many excellent qualities, and his loss is deeply

Biographical Sketch of James Nowlin

James Nowlin and his wife, Martha Collins, were natives of Scotland. They came to America prior to the revolution, and brought all their household and kitchen furniture with them. They settled first in the eastern part of Virginia, but afterward removed to Pittsylvania County. Their only son, Bryan W. Nowlin, was a Captain in the American army during the revolution. He married Lucy Waide, of Virginia, and they had fifteen children, thirteen of whom lived to be grown, and twelve of them married. The eldest son, Peyton, married Lucy Townsend, and settled first in Kentucky, from whence he removed to

Biographical Sketch of George Farrow

The parents of George Farrow came from Scotland, and settled in Fauquier Co., Va., where George was born. He was a soldier of the war of 1812. He married a Miss Massey, and they had George, Jr., Nimrod, John, and Benjamin also two daughters. Benjamin married Lucy Smith, of Virginia, and they had John P., George, Mortimer, Joseph, Margaret, Sarah, Liney M., Mary L., and Amanda M. John P., Sarah, and Margaret came to Missouri. Sarah married William Browning, and settled in St. Charles County, but afterward removed to Lincoln County. Margaret married James B. Barton, and settled in St.

Biographical Sketch of George Gray

George Gray, of Scotland, emigrated to America previous to the revolution, and when that war began he joined the American army and served during the entire struggle. He had several brothers in the British army during the same war. Before leaving Scotland, he married Mary Stuart, and they settled first in Philadelphia, but afterward removed to North Carolina, and from there to Bryan’s Station in Kentucky. Here their son Joseph married Nary Finley, and settled in Warren County, Kentucky. In 1818 he removed to Missouri, and settled on Brush creek in Montgomery County, where he died in 1830. His children

Alexander II English

A112 ALEXANDER II. “Gave proof of his courage” at Bannockburn. Commanded the Scots Army in the battle of Halidonhill. After many victories he at last fell in the battle of Dunham, where his son William was also killed, A. D. 1346. A113 SIR ADAM VI. He was succeeded by his brother John-114. A114 SIR JOHN GORDON. Had a charter from King David confirming the donation of the lands of Strathbogie, A. D. 138. Marched into England with an army and returned with much booty. This was in revenge for the plundering of his lands by the English. He married a

Biography of William A. Phillips

William A. Phillips was one of the pioneers of Kansas who made it free from the dominion of slavery, kept it in the Union during the Civil war, protected the interests of the loyal Indians and afterward did fine service as a congressman. He was born in Scotland Jannary 14, 1824, and had laid the basis of a good education before he was fifteen years of age, when he came with his parents to a farm in Randolph County, Illinois. About the time he reached his majority he became associated with B. J. F. Hannah as editor of the Chester

Biography of Hector Ross

In the town of Sherburne, and near the village of the same name, Chenango county, is a locality known as the “Quarter,” taking its name from the fact that it comprises one-quarter of the town. Here is located a thriving little manufacturing and trading settlement. By far the greater part of the life and prosperity of this place are due to the business capacity and the energy of the man whose portrait appears above. Hector Ross was born in Greenock, Scotland, in 1811. His father’s name was John Ross, who was a molder. living in Greenock. His mother’s maiden name

Biography of Alexander Stalker

In the days of the early development of south-eastern Idaho Alexander Stalker came to the state, and is therefore numbered among its pioneer settlers, but he has not only witnessed the changes that have since occurred, for in all that has tended to the development, progress and advancement of the section he has ever borne his part, and may therefore well be called one of the founders of his county and town. In later years he has been somewhat prominent in political affairs, and at all times he has been a loyal citizen, deeply interested in everything pertaining to the