Location: Saskatchewan Canada

Lawton Slade

Slade Family of Somerset-Fall River, Massachusetts

For the past hundred years – during almost the lifetime, as it were, of Fall River and its entire industrial life – the name Slade has been continually identified with that industrial life and also prominent in other lines of effort in that great city of spindles. In 1812-13, when the real substantial pioneer establishments in the cloth making industry of Fall River were projected and completed – the Troy Cotton and Woolen Manufactory and the Fall River Manufactory – began the Slade name in this connection, Eber Slade of Somerset being one of the most prominent promoters of one of the corporations; he became its first treasurer and filled the position until in the middle twenties. William Slade of Somerset was one of the owners of the site of these first establishments, and was himself an original proprietor of the Pocasset and Watuppa Manufacturing Companies. The brothers Jonathan and William Lawton Slade were among the founders of the celebrated cotton mills of Fall River, both becoming presidents of the corporation. John Palmer Slade, another of Somerset’s sons, figured largely not only in the industrial life of the city but in other lines, becoming president of both the Shove and Laurel Lake Mills. George W. Slade, one of the “forty-niners” of the Pacific coast, was for full fifty years one of the extensive and wholesale merchants of Fall River and his name, too, is coupled with the city’s industrial life. And of younger generations one or more of the sons of some of these are at this time officially and otherwise connected with this industrial life and in other lines, notably Leonard N. and Everett N. Slade, of the firm of John P. Slade & Son, insurance and real estate; David F. Slade, member of the law firm of Slade & Borden; and Abbott E. Slade, now treasurer of the Laurel Lake Mills.

A skin lodge of an Assiniboin chief - Karl Bodmer

Houses of the Assiniboin Tribe

The Assiniboin were, until comparatively recent times, a part of the Yanktonai, from whom they may have separated while living in the forest region of the northern section of the present State of Minnesota. Leaving the parent stock, they joined the Cree, then living to the northward, with whom they remained in close alliance. Gradually they moved to the valleys of the Saskatchewan and Assiniboin Rivers and here were encountered by Alexander Henry in 1775. Interesting though brief notes on the structures of the Assiniboin as they appeared in 1775 and 1776 are contained in the narrative of Henry’s travels

"Encampment of the Piekann Indians" Karl Bodmer 1833

Houses of the Blackfoot Confederacy

The tribes forming this group are the Siksika, or Blackfeet proper, the Piegan, and the Kainah, or Bloods. Closely allied and associated with these were the Atsina, a branch of the Arapaho, but who later became incorporated with the Assiniboin. These tribes roamed over a wide territory of mountains, plains, and valleys. Early accounts of the manners and ways of life of the Blackfeet are to be found in the journals kept by traders belonging to the Hudson’s Bay Company, who penetrated the vast, unknown wilderness southwestward from York Factory daring the eighteenth century. Although the records are all too

Seymour, Violet Isabel Johnson – Obituary

Enterprise, Oregon Violet Isabel Johnson Seymour died May 29, 2007 in Enterprise. She was 76. Mrs. Seymour was born Sept. 5, 1930, to Elmer and Evelyn Johnson in Saskatchewan, Canada. She married Gail Seymour on Jan 1. 1950. She was a professional bowler with a league for seven years. She worked for Boeing Company in the 1970’s, in real estate and with the Boeing Employees Credit Union. She retired from the BECU in 1983. She was a member of the Alpine Golf Course, was active in the Women’s Golf Club Leadership and a member of Civil Air Patrol, attaining the

Burnside, Emily L. Cerkonck Mrs. – Obituary

Baker City, Oregon Emily L. Burnside, 89, a long-time Baker City resident,died Oct. 21, 2004, at St. Elizabeth Health Care Center. Visitations will be from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday at Coles Funeral Home, 1950 Place St. Her graveside service will be at 11 a.m. Monday at Mount Hope Cemetery. Mrs. Burnside was born Oct. 30, 1914, at Saskatchewan Providence, Canada, to Albin and Anna Cerkonck. The family moved from Canada to Fall City, Wash., when she was a young girl. She received her schooling there. She married Elmer Lloyd Burnside in 1935 at Yakima, Wash. They lived in

Siksika Tribe

Siksika Indians. A tribe of the Siksika confederacy (see below). They now (1905) live on a reservation in Alberta, Canada, on upper Bow River, and are officially known as the Running Rabbit and Yellow Horse bands. They were divided into the following subtribes or bands: Aisikstukiks, Apikaiyiks, Emi-tahpahksaiyiks, Motahtosiks, Puhksinahmahyiks, Saiyiks, Siksinokaks,Tsiniktsistsoyiks. Pop. 942 in 1902, 795 in 1909. Siksika Confederacy Siksika Confederacy, (‘black feet’, from siksinam ‘black’, ka the root of ogkatsh ‘foot’. The origin of the name is disputed, but it is commonly believed to have reference to the discoloring of their moccasins by the ashes of the