Location: Sandusky Ohio

Map of Pontiacs War

Chief Pontiac of the Ottawa’s

Immediately after the peace of 1763 all the French forts in the west as far as Green Bay were garrisoned with English troops; and the Indians now began to realize, but too late, what they had long apprehended the selfish designs of both French and English threatening destruction, if not utter annihilation, to their entire race. These apprehensions brought upon the theatre of Indian warfare, at that period of time, the most remarkable Indian in the annals of history, Pontiac, the chief of the Ottawa’s and the principal sachem of the Algonquin Confederacy. He was not only distinguished for his

George Rogers Clark

Moravian Massacre at Gnadenbrutten

In the early part of the year 1763 two Moravian missionaries, Post and Heckewelder, established a mission among the Tuscarawa Indians, and in a few years they had three nourishing missionary stations, viz: Shoenbrun, Gnadenbrutten and Salem, which were about five miles apart and fifty miles west of the present town of Steubenville, Ohio. During our Revolutionary War their position being midway between the hostile Indians (allies of the British) on the Sandusky River, and our frontier settlements, and therefore on the direct route of the war parties of both the British Indian allies and the frontier settlers, they were

Wyandot Indians

Wyandot Tribe: Meaning perhaps “islanders,” or “dwellers on a peninsula.” Occasionally spelled Guyandot. At an earlier date usually known as Huron, a name given by the French from huré, “rough,” and the depreciating suffix -on. Also called: Hatindiaβointen, Huron name of Huron of Lorette. Nadowa, a name given to them and many other Iroquoian tribes by Algonquians. Telamatenon, Delaware name, meaning “coming out of a mountain or cave.” Thastchetci’, Onondaga name. Connection. The Wyandot belonged to the Iroquoian linguistic family. Wyandot Location. The earliest known location of the Huron proper was the St. Lawrence Valley and the territory of the

Biography of Peter Moyer

Peter Moyer. On the old historic farm in Shawnee County, not far from North Topeka, which was located by the Hon. Thomas Ewing of Ohio, and which was later occupied by the famous United States military leader, Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman, resided Peter Moyer, who had lived in this community since 1878. Prior to that year he had lived in a number of communities, in Ohio, Indiana and Michigan, but after coming to Kansas settled permanently and had never cared to leave the Sunflower State. He had devoted himself to farming throughout his career and the success that had come

Biographical Sketch of J. W. McCormich

J. W. McCormich, postmaster, born in Sandusky, Erie Co., Ohio, and March 10, 1847. Enlisted in the United States army in Company K, Third Ohio Cavalry, November 1861, and was discharged in August, 1865. He moved from Ohio to Michigan, and came to Jewell County, Kan., in 1870 and took a homestead, a part of which is now the town of Burr Oak, and he is now the owner of the same, less a few lots, which have been sold. Has held the office of Township Clerk, Trustee and Justice of the Peace. Has held the last named office for

Biographical Sketch of Jay N. Clarke

Clarke, Jay N.; sales agent; born, Sandusky, O., Aug. 19, 1855; son of William H. and Mary Newton Clarke; educated, Sandusky public schools; married, Cleveland, 1876, Pauline Doll; issue, two sons and one daughter, Mrs. H. G. Hock, Harry N. Clarke and Norris J. Clarke; is a practical mechanic, having worked many years as a machinist and toolmaker; was employed as supt. of shops for several years; then took up the sales dept., and has been a salesman for the last five years; have been sales agent in Cleveland for The Bethlehem Steel Co. of South Bethlehem, Pa.; K. of

Biographical Sketch of Oliver N. Chamberlain

Chamberlain, Oliver N.; architect; born, Portsmouth, O., Oct. 10, 1882; son of Irwin and Mary J. Finy Chamberlain; educated, common schools, Portsmouth, O., and private instructor at Columbus, O.; married, Sandusky, July 22, 1905, Carrie Iona Richards; one child; ten years work at practical construction work; two years in the general contracting business, in Cleveland; six years a practicing architect, in Cleveland, doing a general line of work; member Lakewood Chamber of Commerce. Recreations: Baseball and Bowling.

Biographical Sketch of George P. Hart

Hart, George P.; grain and coal dealer; born, Sandusky, O., Hay 30, 1858; son of William and Louise Hess Hart; grammar and high school education, Sandusky; married, Milan, 0., Aug. 11, 1881, Debra M. Wilcox; issue, Bertha L., Ernest G., and Bella; in business since 1881; stock dealer in cattle first, then became grain and coal dealer; came to do business in Cleveland in 1901; 32nd° Mason.

Biographical Sketch of Herman B. Van Tress

Van Tress, Herman B.; dentist; born, Ohio, Oct. 8, 1865; son of Cyrus H. and Jane Donaldson Van Tress; educated, public schools, Wilmington, O.; married, Sandusky, O., Sept. 6, 1894, Eva D. Gordon; issue, two daughters, Bessie and Gladys; received professional training at The Ohio College of Dental Surgery, Department of Dentistry, University of Cincinnati; graduating with degree of D. D. S., March 11, 1891; member Ohio Dental Society, Northern Ohio Dental Society, and Cleveland Dental Society; came to Cleveland in the spring of 1897; went to Los Angeles, Cal., immediately after his marriage, and remained there about two years

Biographical Sketch of Oscar Textor

Textor, Oscar; chemist; born, Sandusky, O., March 10, 1860; son of Albert and Anna Rhode Textor; educated, University of Michigan, degree Pharmaceutical Chemist; two years instructor in chemistry; married, Cleveland, June 3, 1886; Minnie A. Dunbar; one son, born Oct. 26, 1888; member American Chemical Society, American Institute Mining Engineers.