Rockingham County NH

Biography of Hosea Ballou Carter

Hosea Ballou Carter, son of Susan Shannon (Merrick) Carter and Tappan Sargent Carter, was born at East Hampstead, Rockingham County, N.H., on September 5, 1834. He was educated in the public schools of Hampstead and at Atkinson Academy, where he was a classmate of General William Cogswell, of Bradford, Mass., and later of Salem, Mass. …

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Narrative of the Captivity of Mrs. Isabella M’coy – Indian Captivities

Narrative of the Captivity of Mrs. Isabella M’coy, who was taken Captive at Epsom, N. H., in the Year 1747. Collected From the Recollections of Aged People who knew her, by the Rev. Jonathan Curtis, a Minister of that Town, about Seventeen Years ago, and by Him Communicated to the Publishers of the New Hampshire …

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Biographical Sketch of Maurice Maschke

Maschke, Maurice; collector of customs; born, Cleveland, Oct. 16, 1868; son of Joseph and Rosa Salinger Maschke; educated, Central High School, Cleveland, Phillips Academy, Exeter, N. H., and Harvard University; married, Cleveland, June 10, 1903, Minnie Rice; issue, Helen and Maurice, 2nd.; 1890, admitted to practice law in State of Ohio; appointed chief deputy recorder, …

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Biographical Sketch of Worchester Reed Warner

Warner, Worchester Reed; manufacturer; born, Cummington, Hampshire County, Mass., May 16, 1846; son of Franklin J. and Vesta Wales (Reed) Warner; educated, district school, Cummington; (D. Mech. Sc., Western University of Pennsylvania, 1897) ; married, Cleveland, Cornelia F. Blakemore, of Philadelphia, June 26, 1890; learned machinist’s trade at Boston and at Exeter, N. H.; with …

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King William’s War – Indian Wars

The war commonly called by the colonists, “King William’s War,” commenced in 1688 and ended in 1697. The object of the French was the expulsion of the English from the northern and middle provinces. The English directed their efforts against Canada. The French secured the services of the greater part of the Indians, and the united forces spread death and desolation in all directions.

Narrative of the Captivity of Nehemiah How

A Narrative of the captivity of Nehemiah How, who was taken by the Indians at the Great Meadow Fort above Fort Dummer, where he was an inhabitant, October 11th, 1745. Giving an account of what he met with in his traveling to Canada, and while he was in prison there. Together with an account of Mr. How’s death at Canada. Exceedingly valuable for the many items of exact intelligence therein recorded, relative to so many of the present inhabitants of New England, through those friends who endured the hardships of captivity in the mountain deserts and the damps of loathsome prisons. Had the author lived to have returned, and published his narrative himself, he doubtless would have made it far more valuable, but he was cut off while a prisoner, by the prison fever, in the fifty-fifth year of his age, after a captivity of one year, seven months, and fifteen days. He died May 25th, 1747, in the hospital at Quebec, after a sickness of about ten days. He was a husband and father, and greatly beloved by all who knew him.

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