Pima County AZ

Papago Indians

Papago Indians. Signifying “bean people,” from the native words paphh, “beans,” and  óotam, “people.” Also called: Saikinne, Si’-ke-na, Apache name for Pima, Papago, and Maricopa. Táh’ba, Yavapai name. Teχpamais, Maricopa name. Tóno-oōhtam, own name, signifying “people of the desert.” Vidshi itikapa, Tonto name. Papago Connections The Papago belong to the Piman branch of the Uto-Aztecan …

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Biography of Charles Trumbull Hayden

Charles Trumbull Hayden, whose name is linked with the early history of Arizona, was born in Windsor, Connecticut, April 4th, 1825. When eighteen years old he taught school in New Jersey, and afterwards near New Albany, Indiana, and in St. Louis, Missouri. In 1848 he loaded a wagon with merchandise, and left Independence, Missouri, for …

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Papago Tribe

A Piman tribe, closely allied to the Pima, whose original home was the territory south and south east of Gila River, especially south of Tucson, Arizona, in the main and tributary valleys of the Rio Santa Cruz, and extending west and south west across the desert waste known as the Papaguería, into Sonora, Mexico

Biography of Peter Rainsford Brady

Among the early pioneers of Arizona, none bore a more prominent part in its development than Peter Rainsford Brady. He came, on his paternal side, from good old Irish stock. His mother, Anna Rainsford, was from Virginia. He was born in Georgetown, District of Columbia, August 4th, 1825; received his education, in part, at the …

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