Oklahoma City Oklahoma

Slave Narrative of Hannah McFarland

Person Interviewed: Hannah McFarland Location: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Place of Birth: Georgetown, South Carolina Date of Birth: February 29, 1853 Age: 85 I was born in Georgetown, South Carolina, February 29, 1853. My father was name James Gainey and my mother was name Katie Gainey. There was three chillun born to my folks doing slavery. …

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Slave Narrative of Robert R. Grinstead

Person Interviewed: Robert R. Grinstead Location: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Place of Birth: Lawrence County, Mississippi Date of Birth: Feb. 17, 1857 Age: 80 I was born in Lawrence County, Mississippi, February 17, 1857. My father’s name is Elias Grinstead, a German, and my mother’s name is Ann Greenstead after that of her master. I am …

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Biographical Sketch of Mrs. Hubert Ambrister

(See Grant)-Julia Theresa daughter of William Columbus and Jane (Davis) Patton, married Dr. Francis Bartow Fite; and they were the parents Frances Fite, born Sept. 24, 1893, in Muskogee. She was educated in National Cathedral School, Washington, D. C., and graduated from Vassar College. She married at Muskogee July 7, 1920, Hubert, son Samuel A. …

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Slave Narrative of George Conrad, Jr.

Person Interviewed: George Conrad, Jr. Location: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Place of Birth: Connersville, Harrison County, Kentucky Date of Birth: February 23, 1860 Age: 77 I was born February 23, 1860 at Connersville, Harrison County, Kentucky. I was born and lived just 13 miles from Pariah. My mother’s name is Rachel Conrad, born at Bourbon County, …

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Fort Gibson Conference with the Indians, 1834

One of the most important Indian conferences ever held in the Southwest, occurred at Fort Gibson in 1834 for it paved the way for agreements and treaties essential to the occupation of a vast country by one hundred thousand members of the Five Civilized Tribes emigrating from east of the Mississippi; to the security of settlers and travelers in a new country; to development of our Southwest to the limits of the United States and beyond and contributed to the subsequent acquisition of the country to the coast, made known to us by the pioneers to Santa Fe and California traveling through the region occupied by the “wild” Indians who, at Fort Gibson, gave assurances of their friendship. It is true, these assurances were not always regarded, and many outrages were afterwards committed on the whites and by the whites, but the Fort Gibson conference was the beginning and basis upon which ultimately these things were accomplished.

Biographical Sketch of B. H. Markham

(See Ghigau)-Bettie Ann, daughter of James Walker and Lucy Cordelia Skinner, was born April 12, 1888. Married at Clarksville, Arkansas, December 23, 1909 Baird Hackett Markham, born March 28, 1887, in Decatur, Texas. They are the parents of Jewell Marie, born August 17, 1911 and Baird Hackett, son of Winston Baird and Ada Hackett Markham, …

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Biographical Sketch of Mrs. William R. Samuel

(See Downing) Minnie L., daughter of Clement and Rebecca Caroline (Bryan) Hayden, was born at Chouteau April 5, 1879. She was educated in Liberty, Mo. Married on April 21, 1901, William Ruben Samuel, born February 2, 1869 in Calloway County, Missouri. He graduated May 28, 1902, from Stephens College, Columbia, Missouri. They are the parents …

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