Location: Montgomery County AL

Montgomery County Alabama Marriage Records

The following information details the Montgomery County Alabama Marriage Records available online. Hosted at Alabama GenWeb Archives Misc. Marriage Records Marriage Records Connected to the Samuel Pool Bayne Family Bozeman Marriages 1827-1876 Cameron Marriages (Jefferson, Mobile, & Montgomery Counties) Grimes Marriages in Alabama, 1821 – 1934 Vann, Van Marriage Licenses, Vol. A-18, 1817-1919 Various Marriages for Urquharts, Williams, and related families, 1818-1915 Hosted at Ancestry.com $ Alabama Marriages, 1809-1920 $ This database is a collection of marriage records from the state between 1809 and 1920. Researchers will find the names of both bride and groom along with the marriage date.

Montgomery County, Alabama Newspapers

Hosted at Montgomery County, USGenWeb Archives Project Excerpts Of Interest From The Montgomery Daily Advertiser – 1866, Montgomery, Alabama Excerpts Of Interest From The Montgomery Daily Advertiser: 1871 – 1872, Montgomery, Alabama Excerpts Of Interest From “Southern Plantation,” January – March 1875, Montgomery, Alabama Interments Reported January 1, 1881, Montgomery, Alabama Interments Reported January 20, 1881, Montgomery, Alabama Social Calendar, Alabama Journal News, June 8, 1944, Montgomery, Alabama Social Calendar, Alabama Journal News, June 6, 1944, Montgomery, Alabama James C. Keefe Receives His Son’s (Robert J. Keefe) Posthumous Award, June 6, 1944, Montgomery, Alabama St. Mark’s Methodist Church Society Holds

Creek Burial Customs

The Creeks had burial customs resembling those of the Chickasaw, and, in some instances, deposited the remains of their dead beneath the floors of their habitations. To quote from Bartram: ” The Muscogulges bury their deceased in the earth. They dig a four-square deep pit under the cabin or couch which the deceased lay on, in his house, lining the grave with Cypress bark, where they place the corpse in a sitting posture, as if it were alive; depositing with him his gun, tomahawk, pipe, and such other matters as he had the greatest value for in his life time.”

Muklasa Indians

Muklasa Tribe: Meaning in Alabama and Choctaw, “friends,” or “people of one nation.” Connections. Since the Muklasa did not speak Muskhogean and their name is from the Koasati, Alabama, or Choctaw language, and since they were near neighbors of the two former, it is evident that they were connected with one or the other of them. Location. On the south bank of Tallapoosa River in Montgomery County. (See Florida and Oklahoma) History. When we first hear of the Muklasa in 1675 they were in the position above given and remained there until the end of the Creek-American War, when they

Muskogee Indians

Muskogee. Meaning unknown, but perhaps originally from Shawnee and having reference to swampy ground. To this tribe the name Creeks was ordinarily applied. Also called: Ani’-Gu’sa, by the Cherokee, meaning “Coosa people,” after an ancient and famous town on Coosa River. Ku-û’sha, by the Wyandot. Ochesee, by the Hitchiti. Sko’-ki han-ya, by the Biloxi. Muskogee Connections. The Muskogee language constitutes one division of the Muskhogean tongues proper, that which I call Northern. Muskogee Location. From the earliest times of which we have any record these people seem to have had towns all the way from the Atlantic coast of Georgia

Montgomery County, Alabama Census Records

  1830 Montgomery County, Alabama Census Free 1830 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial  1830 Montgomery County, Census (images and index) $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems $ Hosted at Census Guide 1830 U.S. Census Guide 1840 Montgomery County, Alabama Census Free 1840 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial  1840 Montgomery County, Census (images and index) $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems $ Hosted at Census Guide 1840 U.S. Census Guide 1850 Montgomery County, Alabama Census Free 1850 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial 

Montgomery County, Alabama Cemetery Records

Most of these cemetery listings are complete indices at the time of transcription, however, in some cases we list the listing when it is only a partial listing. Hosted at Montgomery County, USGenWeb Archives Project Barnette Cemetery, Montgomery, Alabama Some Inhabitants Of City Cemetery, Montgomery, Alabama Day Family Cemetery, Montgomery, Alabama Graves Burying Ground, Montgomery, Alabama Haardt Cemetery, Montgomery, Alabama Harper Cemetery, Montgomery, Alabama Howell Cemetery, Montgomery, Alabama Manning Springs Cemetery McDade Cemetery, Montgomery, Alabama Dr. Nicholas Lewis Meriwether Cemetery, Montgomery, Alabama Old Philadelphia Cemetery, Montgomery, Alabama Tabernacle Cemetery, Montgomery, Alabama Urquhart Cemetery, Montgomery, Alabama Ware-Green Cemetery, Montgomery, Alabama Wright

Biography of James P. Goodall

JAMES P. GOODALL.- There are some hundreds of men upon our coast whose life experiences embrace as much of romance and adventure as was every told in the pages of Marryat, Irving, or of Smollet. For a full recital of this, we must refer the inquirer to such men as the genial gentleman whose name appears above, that he may in his own home, in the beautiful city of Jacksonville, Oregon, recount as to us the stories of his life upon this coast. He was born at Milledgeville, Georgia, in 1818, and at that city and at Columbus in the

Biography of J. Q. Chenoweth

Is a native of Kentucky, born in Louisville, in 1841, and raised manhood by his grand-parents, in Harrison County of that state. In 1872, he resigned his seat in the senate of Kentucky to come into this state, and the loss of Kentucky proved the gain of Texas. He came direct to Bonham and opened his Law Office people of North Texas are acquainted with his history from that time. Before he went into public life in Kentucky, he completed a thorough course of study in the law-office of Elmore, Keys & Gunter, at Montgomery, Ala., after which he was