Location: Monterey California

Clermont, Osage Chief

Western Garrison Life

Grant Foreman describes the early life in a Western Garrison; providing insights on some of the traders in the region, the deaths of Seaton, Armstrong, Wheelock and Izard, all soldiers obviously familiar to him. But he also shares the story of the elopement of Miss Sarah Knox Taylor, daughter of General Taylor, to Lieutenant Jefferson Davis… yes, THAT Jefferson Davis.

An interesting section of the chapter are the references to the punishments inflicted upon the soldiers in the event of their disobedience.

Painted by Catlin in 1834, the picture attached is of Clermont, chief of the Osage Tribe. Clermont is painted in full length, wearing a fanciful dress, his leggings fringed with scalp-locks, and in his hand his favorite and valued war-club.

Biography of P. H. McEvoy

P. H. McEvoy, the subject of this sketch was born May, 9, 1848, in Sidney, Australia. He left Australia with his parents in 1849, for San Francisco, by way of Honolulu. After leaving Honolulu the vessel met with such adverse winds and weather, that it was six months before land was sighted at Monterey, California. This long voyage had depleted the stores of provisions and water to such an extent that for two weeks prior to sighting land, everyone on shipboard was put on an allowance of both food and water, passengers receiving such small rations that when land was

Biography of Warren P. Hunt

Warren Palmerton Hunt, who has been a highly respected citizen of Lewiston since 1862, and is numbered among the California pioneers of 1854, was born in Erie County, New York, March 13, 1832, a son of Isaac and Diantha (Allbee) Hunt, the former a native of Vermont and the latter of the Empire state. In 1852 the father went by way of the Cape Horn route to California, but returned to his farm in Erie County, where he made his home until his death, which occurred in the eighty-sixth year of his age. His wife passed away in her eighty-second

Biography of Job Francis Dye

Among the figures who stand prominently forth on the pages of western history is the gentleman whose name introduces this review. His was a marvelous record of long connection with the events which go to make up the annals of the Pacific coast. He was one of those honored pioneers who blazed a path for future cavalcades to follow; who bravely turned their faces from the cities of the east, with all the advantages of wealth and civilization, and cast their fortunes with the western frontier, in all its wildness and primitive modes of life; who, rather than enjoy the

Biography of John Brown, Sr.

John Brown, Sr., was born in Worcester, Massachusetts, in 1817, and when but a boy came to St. Louis, Missouri, with his parents, where they died. He began rafting on the Mississippi and then went to New Orleans, and thence by ship to Galveston, suffering a shipwreck on his route. He returned to Fort Leavenworth by the Red River route. Was at the battle of San Jacinto, and first saw Santa Ana when taken prisoner. Remained two years at Fort Leavenworth; and then went to the Rocky Mountains and for fourteen years hunted and trapped from the headwaters of the

Dorrance, Tom – Obituary

Tom Dorrance, 93, retired rancher and famous horseman in Oregon and California, died in Monterey, Calif., on June 11, 2003. He was born in Enterprise May 11, 1910. Mr. Dorrance enjoyed helping people with their horses and in later years conducted horse clinics. He was the author of the book “True Unity” and invented the tilt-up automatic gate. He was recognized for his horsemanship in publications such as the New York Times, People Magazine, and Western Horseman and was a former 4-H leader in Oregon and served as president of the Wallowa County Stockgrowers Association in 1956. He received the