Location: Long Island New York

Silas Wood's sketch of the town of Huntington

Silas Wood’s sketch of the town of Huntington, L.I.

Silas Wood’s sketch of the town of Huntington, L.I. is a small manuscript of 63 pages which provides an authoritative look at the early history of Huntington New York, from its first settlement to the end of the American revolution. Particularly fascinating to our Native American researchers is the history of the early interaction with the Matinecoes, the Massapeags, and the Secataugs.

Descendants of Isaac Benjamin of New Bedford, MA

The New Bedford Benjamin family here considered – some of the descendants of Isaac Benjamin, one of whose sons, the late Isaac W. Benjamin, was for years officially identified with the New Bedford Cordage Company and a public servant of the city of New Bedford of rare fidelity and usefulness – is a branch of the Livermore, Maine, family of the name and it of the still earlier family of Watertown, Mass., where arrived John Benjamin Sept. 16, 1632, in the ship “Lion.”

St John River Map

John Gyles Captivity Narrative – Indian Captivities

John Gyles captivity narrative provides a stunning display of Abenaki culture and lifestyle, as it was in the 1690’s. John was 10 years old when he was taken captive in the attack on Pemaquid (Bristol Maine) and his narrative provides an accounting of his harrowing treatment by his Indian captors, as well as the three years exile with his French owners at Jemseg New Bruswick. His faith in Christ remains central in the well-being of his mind throughout his ordeal.

Biography of Col. Thomas W. Scudder

Few of the Kansas territorial pioneers are still living. One of them is Col. Thomas W. Scudder, of Topeka. Colonel Scudder made a splendid record as a soldier with the fighting columns of the First Kansas Cavalry during the Civil war. He also had many interesting experiences in the border warfare in 1857. Much of his Kansas experience was on a pre-emption claim of 103 acres, the place where he now lives, before the war in Shawnes County, and he has long been a resident of Topeka, where he has enjoyed the association and friendship of many prominent men. He

Biography of Joseph C. Dodds, M. D., B. L.

Joseph C. Dodds, M. D., B. L. Long identified with Champaign County as a physician and surgeon and also as a citizen and business man, Doctor Dodds has lived in this county since he was ten years of age. He was born on Long Island, New York, June 15, 1864. At the age of ten he came to Champaign to live with his uncle, Dr. J. G. Chambers, brother of his mother. Here Doctor Dodds was educated, graduating from the Urbana High School, from the University of Illinois with the class of 1886, attended the University of Michigan Medical School

Biography of Henry Knight Brooks

Henry Knight Brooks of Topeka is a Kansas man by adoption, and is as loyal to the state as any native citizen. The state may properly congratulate itself that Mr. Brooks has found a congenial home here. As an inventor, manufacturer and practical all around mechanic he has a genius which has made his name familiar in industrial circles, not alone in Kansas but in many parts of the United States. For one thing he deserves credit for building up and developing the Capital Iron Works at Topeka, one of the cornerstones of that city’s industrial prosperity. However, that has

Poospatuck Tribe

Poospatuck Indians, Poospatuck Tribe, Poosepatuck Indians. Also called Uncachogee. One of the 13 tribes of Long Island, New York, probably subordinate to the Montauk. They occupied the south shore from Patchogue Island to the Shinnecock Country. In 1666 a reservation was ceded to their sachem, Tobaccus, on Forge river, a short distance above the town of Mastic, where a few mixed-bloods still survive, with no knowledge of their language or customs, on a state reservation of 50 acres. Elizabeth Joe, their woman sachem and last chief, died in 1832. In 1890 they numbered 10 families, governed by 3 trustees. For

Patchoag Tribe

Patchoag Indians (where they divide in two, referring to two streams forming one river – Trumbull). A tribe on the south coast of Long Island, New York, extending from Patchogue to Westhampton. Besides their principal village, bearing the same name, they had others at Fireplace, Mastic, Moriches, and Westhampton. The Connetquot Indians were a part of this tribe. The survivors are known as Poosepatuck. Connetquot Indians Described by Thompson 1Thompson, Long Island, 293, 1839 as a semi-tribe or family of the Patchoag tribe occupying in 1683 the east side of Connetquot River, about Patchogue, in Suffolk County, Long Island, New

Biography of William W. Rose

William W. Rose has been practicing his profession as architect in the metropolitan district of Kansas City for thirty years. Without question he ranks as one of the ablest men both in the artistic and practical branches of his profession. Mr. Rose had also been prominently identified with civic affairs, and is well remembered as mayor of Kansas City, Kansas, during a very critical period of municipal affairs. He is now head of the architectural firm of Rose & Peterson, with offices in the Barker Building. He was born at Oyster Bay, Long Island, New York, March 12, 1864, second

Alcock, Percy Hunt – Obituary

Percy H. Alcock, a well-known San Carlos resident of 24 years, died yesterday [September 19, 1967] in San Francisco after a short illness. He and his wife, Augusta, have lived at 729 Elm Street. Mr. Alcock was born in Grantham, England, and came to the United States in 1910, residing in Long Island, New York. He was a veteran of World War I and during his lifetime was a public accountant and worked also as a cost accountant for an advertising agency. He was retired at the time he passed away and his favorite hobby was gardening. The flowers he