Long Island New York

Silas Wood’s sketch of the town of Huntington, L.I.

Silas Wood’s sketch of the town of Huntington, L.I. is a small manuscript of 63 pages which provides an authoritative look at the early history of Huntington New York, from its first settlement to the end of the American revolution. Particularly fascinating to our Native American researchers is the history of the early interaction with the Matinecoes, the Massapeags, and the Secataugs.

The Cox family in America

Two volumes of Cox family genealogy combined as one. The first volume contains information about the various early Cox families across America. The second volume deals specifically with the descendants of James and Sarah Cock of Killingworth upon Matinecock, in the township of Oysterbay, Long Island, New York.

Poospatuck Tribe

Poospatuck Indians, Poospatuck Tribe, Poosepatuck Indians. Also called Uncachogee. One of the 13 tribes of Long Island, New York, probably subordinate to the Montauk. They occupied the south shore from Patchogue Island to the Shinnecock Country. In 1666 a reservation was ceded to their sachem, Tobaccus, on Forge river, a short distance above the town …

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Shinnecock Tribe

Shinnecock Indians. An Algonquian tribe or band on Long Island, New York, formerly occupying the south coast from Shinnecock Bay to Montauk Point. Many of them joined the Brotherton Indians in New York. About 150 still remain on a reservation of 750 acres, 3 miles west of Southampton, having intermarried with Negroes until their aboriginal …

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Patchoag Tribe

Patchoag Indians (where they divide in two, referring to two streams forming one river – Trumbull). A tribe on the south coast of Long Island, New York, extending from Patchogue to Westhampton. Besides their principal village, bearing the same name, they had others at Fireplace, Mastic, Moriches, and Westhampton. The Connetquot Indians were a part …

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Descendants of Isaac Benjamin of New Bedford, MA

The New Bedford Benjamin family here considered – some of the descendants of Isaac Benjamin, one of whose sons, the late Isaac W. Benjamin, was for years officially identified with the New Bedford Cordage Company and a public servant of the city of New Bedford of rare fidelity and usefulness – is a branch of the Livermore, Maine, family of the name and it of the still earlier family of Watertown, Mass., where arrived John Benjamin Sept. 16, 1632, in the ship “Lion.”

Pequot Tribe

Pequot Indians (contr. of Paquatauog, ‘destroyers.’- Trumbull). An Algonquian tribe of Connecticut. Before their conquest by the English in 1637 they were the most dreaded of the southern New England tribes. They were originally but one people with the Mohegan, and it is possible that the term Pequot was unknown until applied by the eastern …

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John Gyles Captivity Narrative – Indian Captivities

John Gyles captivity narrative provides a stunning display of Abenaki culture and lifestyle, as it was in the 1690’s. John was 10 years old when he was taken captive in the attack on Pemaquid (Bristol Maine) and his narrative provides an accounting of his harrowing treatment by his Indian captors, as well as the three years exile with his French owners at Jemseg New Bruswick. His faith in Christ remains central in the well-being of his mind throughout his ordeal.

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