Location: Lawrence County KY

Slave Narrative of Elphas P. Hylton

LAWRENCE CO. (Edna Lane Carter) Extract from the Civil War diary kept by Elphas P. Hylton, a Lawrence Co. volunteer in the Union Army. “On 17th of July (1864) I was detailed for picket duty and saw three thousand negro soldiers on a grand review, a black cloud to see. On the 18th I was relieved of duty. Here I became dissatisfied as a soldier on account of the negro, negro, negro. On the 23rd we began to get ready to leave this negro hole and on the 24th, to our great joy and gladness, we were sent into camp

Boyd County, Kentucky

BOYD CO. (Carl F. Hall) The Commonwealth of Kentucky, having for a northern boundary the Ohio River-the dividing line between the northern free states and the southern slave states has always been regarded as a southern state. As in the other states of the old south, slavery was an institution until the Thirteenth Ammendment to the Constitution of the United States gave the negro freedom in 1865. Kentucky did not, as other southern states, secede from the Union, but attempted to be neutral during the Civil War. The people, however, were divided in their allegience, furnishing recruits for both the

Biography of James Franklin Norton

JAMES FRANKLIN NORTON, merchant and farmer of Eminence, Missouri, is a native of the Blue Grass State, born in Lawrence County, in 1839. His father, David Norton, who was reared in Virginia, moved to Kentucky at an early date and when our subject was but an infant came to Audrain County, Missouri, where he passed his last days. He was a prominent farmer and stockraiser, and while a resident of Audrain County held the office of justice of the peace. Politically he was a Democrat, and fraternally a Mason. His death occurred in 1852 when about forty years of age.

Biography of William L. Ryder

Prominent among the businessmen of Payette is William Louis Ryder, who for eight years has been closely identified with the history of the city as a representative of one of its most important business interests. He is a man of keen discrimination and sound judgment, and his executive ability and excellent management have brought to the concern with which he is connected a large degree of success. The safe, conservative policy which he inaugurated commends itself to the judgment of all, and has secured to the company a patronage which makes the volume of trade transacted over its counters of

Lawrence County, Kentucky Census Records

1790 Lawrence County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1790 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free Hosted at Lawrence County USGenWeb Archives Project Hosted at Census Guide 1800 U.S. Census Guide 1800 Lawrence County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1800 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free Hosted at Census Guide 1800 U.S. Census Guide 1810 Lawrence County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1810 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free Hosted at Census Guide 1810 U.S. Census Guide 1820 Lawrence County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1820 Census

Lawrence County, Kentucky Cemetery Records

Lawrence County Lawrence County, Kentucky Cemetery Records Hosted at Lawrence County USGenWeb Archives Project Austin-Diamond Cemetery Bell Cemetery Benard Cemetery Bernard-Yates Cemetery Burke Cemetery Chandler Cemetery Childres Cemetery Collinsworth Cemetery Collinsworth Shortridge Cemetery Collinsworth Cemetery Estep Cemetery Georges Creek Cemetery Harmon Cemetery Harmon Cemetery Lambert Cemetery Mayo Cemetery Moore Cemetery Moses Preston Cemetery No Name Cemetery No Name Cemetery Art Preston’s Cemetery Rowe Cemetery Robert Preston Cemetery VanHoose Cemetery Webb Cemetery Wheeler Cemetery Lawrence County, Kentucky Cemetery Records Hosted at Lawrence County, Kentucky KYGenWeb Adams Cemetery Arrington Cemetery Austin-Boyd Cemetery Bell Cemetery Benard Cemetery Benard Yates Berry Cemetery Blevins (Tommy

Biography of Hon. R. S. Strahan

HON. R.S. STRAHAN. – Judge Strahan, as a member of the Oregon supreme court, is widely known as being able and upright, and is universally recognized as one of our most popular representatives of the state judiciary. He was born in Kentucky in 1835. During his childhood he removed with his father to the Platte reserve, as the section was then known, in Missouri, and several years later to Mexico in the same state, living on a farm until he reached manhood, and cultivating the use of brain, brawn and nerve, and cherishing a country-boy’s ambition. The strength and hope