Location: Lauderdale County AL

1850 Madison County Alabama Mortality Schedule optimized

Alabama Mortality Census Records

The 1850, 1860, 1870, 1880, and 1885 censuses included inquiries about persons who had died in the twelve months immediately preceding the enumeration. The 1850, 1960, 1870, and 1880 mortality census for Alabama all survived. Mortality schedules list deaths from 1 June through 31 May of 1849–50, 1859–60, 1869–70, 1879–80, and 1884–85. They provide nationwide, state-by-state death registers that predate the recording of vital statistics in most states. While deaths are under-reported, the mortality schedules remain an invaluable source of information.

The Spaniards in Alabama and Mississippi

England, having lost her West Florida provinces by the victories of Galvez, and having the American Whigs, as well as the natives of France, Spain and Holland, arrayed against her, was finally forced to retire from the unequal contest. A preliminary treaty of peace was signed at Paris. England there acknowledged our independence, and admitted our southern boundary to be as follows: A line beginning at the Mississippi, at 31° north of the equator, and extending due east to the Chattahoochie River; down that river to the mouth of the Flint, and thence to the St. Mary’s, and along that

Slave Narrative of Jenny Greer

Person Interviewed: Jenny Greer Location: Nashville, Tennessee Place of Birth: Florence, Alabama Age: 84 Place of Residence: 706 Overton Street, Nashville, Tennessee “Am 84 y’ars ole en wuz bawn in Florence, Alabama, ’bout seben miles fum town. Wuz bawn on de Collier plantashun en Marster en Missis wuz James en Jeanette Collier. Mah daddy en mammy wuz named Nelson en Jane Collier. I wuz named atter one ob mah Missis’ daughters. Our family wuz neber sold er divided.” “I’se bin ma’ied once. Ma’ied Neeley Greer. Thank de Lawd I aint got no chilluns. Chilluns ez so bad now I can’t

Slave Narrative of Tom W. Woods

Person Interviewed: Tom W. Woods Location: Alderson, Oklahoma Place of Birth: Florence, Alabama Age: 83 Lady, if de nigger hadn’t been set free dis country wouldn’t ever been what it is now! Poor white folks wouldn’t never had a chance. De slave holders had most of de money and de land and dey wouldn’t let de poor white folks have a chance to own any land or anything else to speak of. Dese white folks wasn’t much better off dan we was. Dey had to work hard and dey had to worry ’bout food, clothes and shelter and we didn’t.

Biography of John Stone

JOHN STONE. Among the prominent farmers and stockraisers of Sugar Loaf Township, Boone County, Arkansas, stands the name of John Stone, whose fine farm and surroundings show what perseverance and industry will accomplish. Mr. Stone was born in Lauderdale County, Ala., in the year 1829, to the marriage of Noble and Mary (Simmons) Stone, natives of the Palmetto State. When both father and mother were children they went with their par-ents to Alabama, grew to mature years in that State, married, and when our subject was about six months old they removed to Marion County, Tennessee There the mother died

Slave Narrative of Spencer Barnett

Interviewer: Miss Irene Robertson Person Interviewed: Spencer Barnett (blind) Location: Holly Grove, Arkansas Age: 81 Occupation: Brakeman on freight train, Farmed, Worked in timber, He sold “shuck mats” and “bottomed” chairs “I was born April 30, 1856. It was wrote in a old Bible. I am 81 years old. I was born 3 miles from Florence, Alabama. The folks owned us was Nancy and Mars Tom Williams. To my recollection they had John, William, and Tom, boys; Jane, Ann, Lucy, and Emma, girls. In my family there was 13 children. My parents name Harry and Harriett Barnett. “Mars Tom Williams

Biography of Milton Gooddell Young

Well known and prominent in the financial circles of Muskogee is Milton Gooddell Young, who is the President of the Security State Bank. Long experience has well qualified him for the important and responsible duties which devolve upon him in this connection and as the years have passed he has made himself a forceful factor among the bankers of his section of the state. He was born in Florence, Alabama, February 15, 1884, and is a son of Andrew M. and Ollie (House) Young.  His father was also prominent in financial circles, being the first bank commissioner of the state

Lauderdale County, Alabama Census Records

  1830 Lauderdale County, Alabama Census Free 1830 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial  1830 Lauderdale County, Census (images and index) $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems $ Hosted at USGenWeb Archives Census Image Project 1830 Lauderdale County, Alabama Census Hosted at US-Census.org 1830 Lauderdale Co. Images Hosted at Lauderdale County, ALGenWeb 1830 Federal Census Hosted at Census Guide 1830 U.S. Census Guide 1840 Lauderdale County, Alabama Census Free 1840 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial  1840 Lauderdale County, Census (images and index) $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems $

Lauderdale County, Alabama Cemetery Records

Most of these cemetery listings are complete indices at the time of transcription, however, in some cases we list the listing when it is only a partial listing. Hosted at Lauderdale County, USGenWeb Archives Project Antioch Cemetery, A Partial Listing, Lauderdale, Alabama Centerhill Church Of Christ Cemetery, Lauderdale, Alabama Greenview Cemetery, Lauderdale County, Alabama Surnames A – F Surnames G – L Surnames M – R Surnames S – Z Section 8 Section 9 Section B Jacksonburg Cemetery, A Partial Listing, Lauderdale, Alabama Mt Zion Church Of Christ Cemetery, Lauderdale, Alabama Shelton Cemetery, Whitehead, Lauderdale Co., AL Hosted at Lauderdale

Biography of William H. Shepard

William H. Shepard. When William H. Shepard left college he chose the work which seemed most congenial and for which he had the greatest apparent adaptability, and entered a bank in Illinois. For thirty consecutive years he has applied himself to the subject of banking, and his business success and prominence is largely due to this concentration of effort along one line. Mr. Shepard is now vice president of the First National Bank of Coffeyville, and is identified with several other important concerns which might be classed as public utilities in that part of Kansas. His branch of the Shepard