Johnstown Pennsylvania

The Johnstown Pennsylvania Flood

An in-depth history of the Johnstown Pennsylvania Flood, complete with many images, both drawn and photographed, maps, and videos depicting the horrors of the flood. – On May 28, 1889, a storm formed over Nebraska and Kansas, moving east. When the storm struck the Johnstown-South Fork area two days later it was the worst downpour that had ever been recorded in that section of the country. The US Signal Service estimated that 6 to 10 inches (150 to 250 mm) of rain fell in 24 hours over the entire section. During the night small creeks became roaring torrents ripping out trees and debris. Telegraph lines were downed and rail-lines were washed out. Before daybreak the Conemaugh River that ran through Johnstown was about to leave its banks…

Biographical Sketch of Milton Freshwater

Freshwater, Milton; paving contractor; born, West Virginia, Sept. 11, 1877; son of E. A. and Clarenda Campbell Freshwater; educated in commercial course at Morgantown, W. Va.; married, Johnstown, Pa., Dec. 31, 1907, Miss C. B. Williams; two children; has worked at the street-paving business since 1893; completing street paving in the following places; Johnstown and …

Biographical Sketch of Milton Freshwater Read More »

Shadows of Despair

Another graphic account of the fearful calamity is furnished by an eye-witness: The dark disaster of the day with its attendant terrors thrilled the world and drew two continents closer together in the bonds of sympathy that bind humanity to man. The midnight terrors of Ashtabula and Chatsworth evoked tears of pity from every fireside …

Shadows of Despair Read More »

Thrilling Experiences

JOHNSTOWN, Pa., June 3, 1889.–Innumerable tales of thrilling individual experiences, each one more horrible than the others, are told. Frank McDonald, a conductor on the Somerset branch of the Baltimore and Ohio, was at the Pennsylvania Railroad depot in this place when the flood came. He says that when he first saw the flood it …

Thrilling Experiences Read More »

Digging for the Dead

A party started in early exploring the huge mass of débris banked against the Pennsylvania Railroad bridge. This collection, consisting of trees, sides of houses, timber and innumerable articles, varies in thickness from three or four feet to twenty feet. It is about four hundred yards long, and as wide as the river. There are …

Digging for the Dead Read More »

The Horror Increases

During the night thirty-three bodies were brought to one house. As yet the relief force is not perfectly organized and bodies are lying around on boards and doors. Within twenty feet of where this was written the dead body of a colored woman lies. Provision has been made by the Relief Committee for the sufferers …

The Horror Increases Read More »

View of the Wreck

Each visitor to the scene of the great disaster witnessed sights and received impressions different from all others. The following graphic account will thrill every reader: The most exaggerative imagination cannot too strongly picture the awful harvest of death, the wreck which accompanied that terrible deluge last Friday afternoon. I succeeded in crossing from the …

View of the Wreck Read More »

Pathetic Scenes

Some of the really pathetic scenes of the flood are just coming to the public ear. John Henderson, his wife, his three children, and the mother of Mrs. Henderson remained in their house until they were carried out by the flood, when they succeeded in getting upon some drift. Mr. Henderson took the babe from …

Pathetic Scenes Read More »

Biographical Sketch of James Arthur Loughry

Loughry, James Arthur; dentist; born, Johnstown, Pa., Nov. 30, 1881; son of Clark Hawkins and Emma Louise Cooper Loughry; educated, Elyria, O., public school, and graduate of High School, 1899; Ohio State University dental education; received degree of D. D. S., 1904; married, Marion, Ind., Dec. 25, 1906, Edith Johnson; one son, James Richard Loughry; …

Biographical Sketch of James Arthur Loughry Read More »

Pin It on Pinterest

Scroll to Top