Location: Gaston County NC

Biography of Rev. Humphrey Hunter

Rev. Humphrey Hunter was born in Ireland, near Londonderry, on the 14th of May, 1775. His paternal grandfather was from Glasgow, in Scotland. His maternal grandfather was from Brest, in France. His descent is thus traced to the Scotch-Irish, and Huguenots of France, forming a race of people who greatly contributed to the spread of civil and religious liberty wherever their lots were cast. In America, the asylum of the oppressed of all nations, many of their descendants occupy proud positions on the page of history, and acted a magnanimous part in the achievement of our independence. At the early

Biography of William Rankin

William Rankin was born in Pennsylvania, on the 10th of January, 1761, and at an early age joined the tide of emigration to the Southern States, and settled in “Tryon,” afterward Lincoln county, N.C. He first entered the service as a private in Captain Robert Alexander’s company, Colonel William Graham’s regiment, and marched to Montfort’s Cove against the Cherokee Indians. In 1779 he volunteered under the same officer, and marched by way of Charlotte and Camden to the relief of Charleston, but finding the city completely invested by the British army, the regiment returned to North Carolina. In 1780, he

Biographical Sketch ofGeneral John Moore

General John Moore was born in Lincoln county, when a part of Anson, in 1759. His father, William Moore, of Scotch-Irish descent, was one of the first settlers of the county and a prominent member of society. He had four sons, James, William, John and Alexander, who, inheriting the liberty-loving principles of that period, were all true patriots in the Revolutionary war. John Moore performed a soldier’s duty on several occasions and was one of the guards stationed at Tuckaseege Ford, watching the movements of Lord Cornwallis after his entrance into Lincoln county. He also acted for a considerable length

Biographical Sketch of Elisha Withers

Elisha Withers was born in Stafford county, Va., on the 10th of August, 1762. His first service in the Revolutionary war was in 1780, acting for twelve months as Commissary in furnishing provisions for the soldiers stationed at Captain Robert Alexander’s, near the Tuckaseege Ford on the Catawba river, their place of rendezvous. After this service, he was drafted and served a tour of three months under Captain Thomas Loftin and Lieut. Robert Shannon, and marched from Lincoln county to Guilford Court-house under Colonels Locke and Hunt. His time having expired shortly before the battle, he returned home. He again

Biography of Captain John Mattocks

Captain John Mattocks was one of the brave soldiers who fell at King’s Mountain. He belonged to a family who resided a few miles below Armstrong’s Ford, on the south fork of the Catawba river, at what is now known as the “Alison old place.” There were three brothers and two sisters, Sallie and Barbara. The whole family, men and women, had the reputation of being “”uncommonly stout”.” John and Charles Mattocks were staunch Whigs, ever ready to engage in any enterprise in defence of the freedom of their country, but Edward Mattocks (commonly called Ned Mattocks) was a Tory.

Biographical Sketch of Captain Samuel Caldwell

Samuel Caldwell was born in Orange County, N.C., on the 10th of February, 1759, and moved to Tryon county, afterward Lincoln, in 1772. He first entered the service in Captain Gowen’s company in 1776, and marched against the Cherokee Indians beyond the mountains. In 1779, he volunteered (in Captain William Chronicle’s company) in the “nine months service,” and joined General Lincoln’s army at Purysburg, S.C. In March, 1780, he joined Captain Isaac White’s company, and marched to King’s Mountain. In the battle which immediately followed, he and his brother, William actively participated. Shortly after this celebrated victory, he attached himself

Bryan C. Walters

Corpl., M. G. Brig., Co. A, 30th Div., 115th Regt.; of Gaston County; son of J. H. and Margaret Walters. Husband of Hattie Noles Walters. Entered service June 25, 1917, at Gastonia, N.C. Promoted to rank of Corpl. July 1, 1918. Fought at Nauroy, Premont, Vaux-Andigny, Selle River, Hindenburg Line, Bellicourt, Voormizelle, Mt. Kimmel. Returned to USA March 22nd, Newport News, Va. Mustered out at Camp Jackson April 2, 1919.

W. T. Warren

1st Class Private, M. G. Btn., Co. A, 30th Div., 115th Regt. Born in Gaston County; the son of J. F. and Mrs. S. Warren. Entered the service July 4, 1917. Was sent to Camp Sevier, S. C., transferred to Camp Merritt, N. J. Went to France May 11, 1918. Fought at Ypres. Returned to the USA Dec. 26, 1918. Mustered out at Camp Greene, N.C., Jan. 25, 1919.

John C. Stroup

Private, Btry. E, 89th Div., 340th F. A.; of Gaston County; son of J. A. and L. E. Stroup. Husband of Annie May Stroup. Entered service June 26, 1918, at Cherryville, N.C. Sent to Camp Jackson, transferred to Camp Stuart, Va. Sailed for France Sept. 6, 1918. Returned to USA May 24, 1919. Mustered out at Camp Lee, Va., June 4, 1919.

William Paul Stroup

Private, Co. E, 81st Div., 324th Regt., Inf.; of Gaston County; son of J. A. and Mrs. L. E. Stroup. Entered service May 28, 1918, at Cherryville, N.C. Sent to Camp Jackson, S. C., transferred to Camp Sevier, then to Camp Mills. Sailed for France Aug. 5, 1918. Fought at Meuse-Argonne. Returned to USA June 18, 1919. Mustered out at Camp Jackson, S. C., June 23, 1919.