Location: Fulton County GA

North America Indian Names of Places in Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, Florida, and Louisiana

The Indians all over this continent had names, traditions, religions, ceremonies, feasts, prayers, songs, dances all, more or less, with symbolism and allegory, adapted to circumstances, just as all other races of mankind. But the world has become so familiar with the continued and ridiculous publications in regard to everything touching upon that race of people that a universal doubt has long since been created and established as to the possibility of refinement of thought and nobleness of action ever having existed among the North American Indian race, ancient or modern; and so little of truth has also been learned

Obituary of Bert Brown

Bert BROWN, age 74 of 102 Walnut St., passed away at the Portland Veteran’s Hospital April 27. He was a retired millworker. Graveside services were held at the Hillcrest Cemetery Saturday, April 30, under the direction of the WW1 Veterans. Mr. BROWN was born in Atlanta, Georgia, Nov. 15, 1891 and had lived in La Grande 40 years. He was a member of the WW1 Veterans and the Blue Mt. Grange. Survivors include his wife, Ella, La Grande; one son, Gilbert BROWN, West Minster, Calif.; three daughters, Mrs. Alice KANNARD, Portland, Mrs. Louella TACY, Oakridge, Ore., and Mrs. Evelyn LOVELESS,

Biographical Sketch of Mrs. J. S. Jones

(See Foreman).— Mary Elizabeth Dege, born in Atlanta, Georgia, October 30, 1881, educated at Pryor and Female Seminary. Married Oct­ober 5, 1907, J. S. Jones, D. D. S. They are the parents of James Staunton, born January 5, 1909; Mary Pauline, born July 7. 1911 and Helen Mercedes Jones, born September 13, 1913. Dr. Jones is a graduate of the Southern Dental College of Atlanta, Georgia. He was a volunteer in the World War and was stationed at Camp Greenleaf, was commissioned a First Lieutenant and transferred to Camp Mills, N. Y. Received his discharge on January 21, 1919. He

Biography of Clement Richardson

Clement Richardson, of Jefferson City, president of the Lincoln Institute, deserves mention as an eminent educator, for his professional work has been not merely instilling knowledge into the minds of pupils but has been broad in its scope, thoughtful in its purposes and human in its tendency. lie has studied the individual and his requirement, has met the needs of the school and has made valuable contributions to literature that has to do with his profession. Mr. Richardson was born June 23. 1878, in Halifax county, Virginia, a son of Leonard and Louise (Barksdale) Richardson. In his youthful days he

Native American History of Milton County, Georgia

Milton County was located in northern Georgia. As part now of Fulton County, all of old Milton County is part of the Atlanta Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area (SMSA.) Its county seat was Alpharetta prior to the annexation of Milton and Campbell Counties by Fulton County in 1932. In 1932 Milton County (on the north) and Campbell County (on the south,) merged with Fulton County. Cobb County ceded the City of Roswell and a section of land along Wileo Creek to Fulton, in order to make the original section of Milton contiguous with Milton. The Native American histories of Campbell, Fulton

Native American History of Fulton County, Georgia

Fulton County located in northern Georgia. Most references state that Fulton County was named for Robert Fulton, the investor of the steam boat. However, recent research by historians have led them to conclude that it was actually named after Hamilton Fulton, a British-born civil engineer, who practiced his profession in Milledgeville (then the Georgia state capital) between 1825 and 1828. All of Fulton County is part of the Atlanta Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area (SMSA.) Its county seat is Atlanta. In 1932 Milton County (on the north) and Campbell County (on the south,) merged with Fulton County. Cobb County ceded the

Slave Narrative of Julia Brown (Aunt Sally)

Interviewer: Geneva Tonsill Person Interviewed: Julia Brown (Aunt Sally) Date of Interview: July 25, 1930 [TR:?] Location: 710 Griffin, Place, N. W., Atlanta, Georgia Ah Always Had A Hard Time Aunt Sally rocked back and forth incessantly. She mopped her wrinkled face with a dirty rag as she talked. “Ah wuz born fo’ miles frum Commerce, Georgia, and wuz thirteen year ole at surrender. Ah belonged to the Nash fambly—three ole maid sisters. My mama belonged to the Nashes and my papa belonged to General Burns; he wuz a officer in the war. There wuz six of us chilluns, Lucy, Malvina,

Slave Narrative of Lewis Favor

Interviewer: Edwin Driskell Person Interviewed: Lewis Favor Location: Atlanta, Georgia [TR: informant also referred to as Favors in this document.] Among Atlanta’s few remaining ex-slaves is one Lewis Favors. When he fully understood this worker’s reasons for approaching him he consented to tell what he had seen and experienced as a slave. Chewing slowly on a large wad of tobacco he began his account in the following manner: “I was born in Merriweather County in 1855 near the present location of Greenville, Georgia. Besides my mother there were eight of us children and I was elder than all of them

Slave Narrative of Alice Bradley

Interviewer: Grace McCune Person Interviewed: Alice Bradley Location: Athens, Georgia Alice Bradley, or “Aunt Alice” as she is known to everybody, “runs cards” and claims to be a seeress. Apologetic and embarrassed because she had overslept and was straightening her room, she explained that she hadn’t slept well because a dog had howled all night and she was uneasy because of this certain forerunner of disaster. “Here t’is Sunday mornin’ and what wid my back, de dog, and de rheumatics in my feets, its [TR: ‘done’ crossed out] too late to go to church, so come in honey I’se glad

Slave Narrative of George Eason

Interviewer: Edwin Driskell Person Interviewed: George Eason Location: Georgia Mr. George Eason was born in Forsyth, Ga., on the plantation of Mr. Jack Ormond. In addition to himself there were six other children, one of whom was his twin brother. He and his brother were the oldest members of this group of children. His mother, who was the master’s cook, had always belonged to the Ormond family while his father belonged to another family, having been sold while he (George) was still a baby. It so happened that Mr. Ormond was a wealthy planter and in addition to the plantation