Location: Franklin County NY

Philip Tarbell (Ta-ra-ke-te), St. Regis

St. Regis Reservation Map and Occupants, 1890

The St. Regis Indians are the successors of the ancient Mohawks, and reside on their reservation in Franklin and St. Lawrence counties, New York, which is 7.3 miles long upon the south line and about 3 miles wide, except where purchases made by the state of New York in 1824 and.1825, as indicated on the map, modify the shape. The original tract was estimated as the equivalent of 6 miles square, or 23,040 acres, and the present acreage, computed by official reports without survey, is given as 14,640 acres. Four main roads diverge from the village of Hogansburg, and these

Map of the Country of the Five Nations

Reservations of the Six Nations in New York and Pennsylvania, 1723-1890

The accompanying map was prepared in 1771 under the direction of William Tryon, captain general and governor in chief of the province of New York, and is as nearly suggestive of the then recognized boundary of the Six Nations as any that has had official sanction. In 1851 Lewis H. Morgan, assisted by Ely S. Parker, a Seneca chief; and afterward an efficient staff Officer of General Grant, and the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, prepared a map for a volume entitled League of the Iroquois, which aimed to define the villages, trails, and boundaries of the Five Nations as they

Five Nations Burial Customs

Writing of the Iroquois or Five Nations, during the early years of the eighteenth century, at a time when they dominated the greater part of the present State of New York, it was said: “Their funeral Rites seem to be formed upon a Notion of some Kind of Existence after Death. They make a large round Hole, in which the Body can be placed upright, or upon its Haunches, which after the Body is placed in it, is covered with Timber, to support the Earth which they lay over, and thereby keep the Body free from being pressed; they then

Biographical Sketch of John B. Jones

John B. Jones, farmer, Sec. 3; P. O. Rardin; born in Franklin Co., N. Y., Sept. 1, 1829; he removed with his parents when quite young to Whitehall, Washington Co., where he attended school and engaged in farming until 15 years of age, when he learned and worked at the ship-carpenter’s trade for three years; then for two years followed sailing on the lakes, and his trade; after which time he located at Astoria, L. I., where he engaged at his trade until 1857, when he emigrated to Illinois, and located in Ashmore Tp., Coles Co., March 1, of the

Biography of Nelson L. Jarvis

NELSON L. JARVIS is known throughout the United States through his association with Jarvis & Jarvis, one of the leading concerns in the country in the field of rubber tired castors. Mr. Jarvis, who is senior partner in the firm, is known as one of the prominent men of Palmer. He is a trustee of the Palmer Savings Bank, and is active and well known in civic and fraternal circles. Nelson L. Jarvis was born in Malone, New York, September 23, 1883, the son of Bernard Jarvis, a native of New York State, who was a carpenter, and Virginia (Boyea)

Biography of Harry Joseph Jeffway

Few men engaged in the electrical construction and contracting business in this part of the State have been trained in so practical and, indeed, in so high grade a school of experience in electrical work as Harry Joseph Jeffway, who not only has an established repute for unrivalled excellence in his Easthampton business, but who throughout the World War was on duty at submarine bases of the greatest responsibility as an electrician, afterwards also continuing in related lines for the United States Government in the shipyards. Mr. Jeffway is an expert in all matters electrical; he has built up an

Biography of William Edward Jeffway

WILLIAM EDWARD JEFFWAY. To the prosperous activities of the electrical business at Easthampton, in which William Edward Jeffway is engaged in company with his brother, Harry Joseph Jeffway, he has brought the results of a varied and practical experience in the employ of a number of concerns engaged both in general manufacturing and in horticulture and orcharding, as well as in electrical matters. A veteran of the World War, he served in the Ordnance Department overseas, and shared with his comrades in a number of important engagements on battlefields in France. He is prominent in the community and social life

Biographical Sketch of Charles Carpenter

CHARLES CARPENTER. – Mr. Carpenter was born in Chattendon county, Vermont, February 1, 1838. He was the third son in a family of eight. Orrin and Jane (Basut) Carpenter were his parents. When thirteen years old he went with his parents to Franklin county, New York, and there received his education. In 1859 he came in company with his brothers J.W. and Henry, to California. They came via the Isthmus of Panama, and on the Pacific side took passage in the older steamer John L. Stevens for San Francisco. While in California Mr. Carpenter was engaged in various occupations, according

Biographical Sketch of Carl D. Smith

Carl D. Smith, although still a young man, has been prominently identified with the establishment of a number of newspapers in the state of New York. He was born in Chateaugay, Franklin county, New York, June 19, 1876, and was educated at the Franklin Academy, Malone, New York. While employed in the office of the Malone Farmer, in 1892, he took up the trade of printing and was thus engaged for a period of three years. He then organized the Adirondack Enterprise, at Saranac Lake, this paper being one of the pioneers in this field of publication in that section

Biographical Sketch of Samuel Bryant

Samuel Bryant, from Woodstock, Vt., came to Emore in 1824, and settled upon the farm owned by Benjamin Davis, on road 19. Here he resided for a few years, then removed to Morristown, where he cleared up the farm now the property of Alfred Dodge. In 1845, he returned to Elmore, remained here five years, then removed to Franklin county, N. Y., where he died, in April, 1882, aged about ninety-two years. His wife died five days later, aged over ninety-three years. Of their family of six children, three are now living, one, Joseph W., in this town. He was