Location: Fort Gibson Oklahoma

Biographical Sketch of Bluford W. Starr

(See Ghigau)-Bluford West Starr, born September 1, 1858 near Ft. Gibson is the son of Bluford West Starr born March 5, 1826 and died April 7, 1855 and his wife Margaret Ann (McDaniel) Starr who died July 4, 1866. Bluford W. having been left an orphan at such an early age struggled against adverse conditions and gained a creditable education. His dominant characteristics are honesty and integrity. He a farmer, stockman and Mason. He married on November 10, 1887 Jessie Adel the daughter of Charles and Marion M. Hutch;, born Aug. 29, 1865 in Dane Co., Wisconsin. They are the

Biographical Sketch of Mrs. Pearl V. Sisson

(See Cordery) Pearl Victoria, daughter of J. F. and Cecilia (Gibson) Haas was born at Tupelo, Lee County Mississippi on August 29, 1879. She married at Fort Gibson, Indian Territory December 4, 1893 Charles Harris Sisson, born November 26, 1859. They are the parents of: Charles Harris born November 5, 1894; Jessie May born July 2, 1896; Sue born December 14, 1898; Mary born January 13, 1900 and Emma Pauline born May 8. 1902. Charles Harris Sisson was appointed Circuit Judge of the Cherokee Nation on May 1, 1897 and elected to Council from Illinois District on August 3, 1903.

Biographical Sketch of Mrs. John T. Mounts

(See Thompson and Thornton)—Evaline, daughter of Lawson and Elsie Jane Martin Runyan, born near Fort Gibson in 1882. Educated in the Cherokee Public Schools and Female Seminary. Married at Fort Gibson in 1912, John Thompson, son of David Albert and Caroline Harriette (Thompson) Mounts, born Thursday February 26, 1880. They are the parents of Thelma J. Mounts.

Slave Narrative of Johnson Thompson

Person Interviewed: Johnson Thompson Place of Birth: Texas Date of Birth: December 1853 Just about two weeks before the coming of Christmas Day in 1853, I was born on a plantation somewheres eight miles east of Bellview, Rusk County, Texas. One year later my sister Phyllis was born on the same place and we been together pretty much of the time ever since, and I reckon there’s only one thing that could separate us slave born children. Mammy and pappy belong to W.P. Thompson, mixed-blood Cherokee Indian, but before that pappy had been owned by three different masters; one was

Slave Narrative of Victoria Taylor Thompson

Person Interviewed: Victoria Taylor Thompson Age: 80 My mother, Judy Taylor, named for her mistress, told me that I was born about three year before the war; that make me about 80 year old so they say down at the Indian Agency where my name is on the Cherokee rolls since all the land was give to the Indian families a long time ago. Father kept the name of ‘Doc’ Hayes, and my brother Coose was a Hayes too, but mother, Jude, Patsy, Bonaparte (Boney, we always called him), Lewis and me was always Taylors. Daddy was bought by the

Slave Narrative of George Kye

Person Interviewed: George Kye Location: Fort Gibson, Oklahoma Age: 110 I was born in Arkansas under Mr. Abraham Stover, on a big farm about twenty miles north of Van Buren. I was plumb grown when the Civil War come along, but I can remember back when the Cherokee Indians was in all that part of the country Joe Kye was my pappy’s name what he was born under back is Garrison County, Virginia, and I took that name when I was freed, but I don’t know whether he took it or not because he was sold off by old Master

Slave Narrative of Morris Sheppard

Person Interviewed: Morris Sheppard Location: Fort Gibson, Oklahoma Date of Birth: November, 1852 Age: 85 Old Master tell me I was borned in November 1852, at de old home place about five miles east of Webbers Falls, mebbe kind of northeast, not far from de east bank of de Illinois River. Master’s name was Joe Sheppard, and he was a Cherokee Indian. Tall and slin and handsome. He had black eyes and mustache but his hair was iron gray, and everybody liked him because he was so good-natured and kind. I don’t remember old Mistress’ name. My mammy was a

Slave Narrative of Mary Grayson

Person Interviewed: Mary Grayson Location: Tulsa, Oklahoma Age: 83 I am what we colored people call a “native.” That means that I didn’t come into the Indian country from somewhere in the Old South, after the war, like so many Negroes did, but I was born here in the old Creek Nation, and my master was a Creek Indian. That was eighty three years ago, so I am told. My mammy belonged to white people back in Alabama when she was born, down in the southern part I think, for she told me that after she was a sizeable girl

Slave Narrative of Harriett Robinson

Person Interviewed: Harriet Robinson Location: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Place of Birth: Bastrop, Texas Date of Birth: September 1, 1842 Age: 95 I was born close to Webbers Falls, in the Canadian District of the Cherokee Nation, in the same year that my pappy was blowed up and killed in the big boat accident that killed my old Master. I never did see my daddy excepting when I was a baby and I only know what my mammy told me about him. He come from across the water when he was a little boy, and was grown when old Master Joseph

Slave Narrative of Chaney Richardson

Person Interviewed: Chaney Richardson Location: Fort Gibson, Oklahoma Age: 90 I was born in the old Caney settlement southeast of Tahlequah on the banks of Caney Creek. Off to the north we could see the big old ridge of Sugar Mountain when the sun shine on him first thing in the morning when we all getting up. I didn’t know nothing else but some kind of war until I was a grown woman, because when I first can remember my old Master, Charley Rogers, was always on the lookout for somebody or other he was lined up against in the