Location: Fayetteville Arkansas

The Cherokee Revolt – Indian Wars

From the removal of the Cherokee Indians from Georgia and Tennessee to Arkansas and their establishment upon the reservation allotted to them by treaty with the Government in Arkansas, they have, until the period of this outbreak to the narrative of which this chapter is devoted, been considered as among the least dangerous and most peaceable of the tribes in that region. But through various causes, chief among which has been notably the introduction among them of a horde of those pests of the West the border ruffians; these half wild, half-breed Nomads were encouraged by these Indians, as it

Slave Narrative of Aunt Adeline

“I was born a slave about 1848, in Hickmon County, Tennessee,” said Aunt Adeline who lives as care taker in a house at 101 Rock Street, Fayetteville, Arkansas, which is owned by the Blakely-Hudgens estate. Aunt Adeline has been a slave and a servant in five generations of the Parks family. Her mother, Liza, with a group of five Negroes, was sold into slavery to John P.A. Parks, in Tennessee, about 1840. “When my mother’s master come to Arkansas about 1849, looking for a country residence, he bought what was known as the old Kidd place on the Old Wire

Biographical Sketch of Herbert W. Hicks

(See Foreman)-Abijah Hicks, born March 2, 1819, married Jan. 30, 1852, Hannah Worcester, born January 29, 1834 in New Echota, Georgia. He died June 4, 1862. Mrs. Hannah Hicks died Feb. 3, 1917. They were the parents of Percy W., Emma L, Edith H., Clara A. and Herbert Worcester Hicks. Percy W. married Elms Garrett and lives at Fort Gibson. Edith married Charles W. Smith and Richard 111. Walker. Clara A. married Nicholas McNair Thornton and George I. Hopson. Herbert Worcester Hicks was born at Park Hill May 18, 1861; and married at Fayetteville, Arkansas, on December 23, 1886, Rachel,

Slave Narrative of R. C. Smith

Person Interviewed: R. C. Smith Occupation: Prophet One morning in May I heard a poor rebel say; “The federal’s a home guard Dat called me from home…” I wish I was a merchant And could write a fine hand, I’d write my love a letter So she would understand. I wish I had a drink of brandy, And a drink of wine, To drink wid dat sweet gal How I wish dat she was mine. If I had a drink of brandy No longer would I roam, I’d drink it wid dat gal of mine Dat wishes me back home.

Biography of Allan Arthur Gilbert, M.D.

Dr. Allan Arthur Gilbert, an internist of St. Louis, who in his practice has gained high professional standing, was born in Burrton, Kansas, May 26, 1890, a son of the Rev. H. M. Gilbert, who was born in South Carolina, but was descended from one of the old families of Connecticut of English lineage. The progenitor of the family in the new world was Mathew Gilbert, who came across the Atlantic on the historic Mayflower and was the first deputy governor of Connecticut under King George. Among the ancestors of Dr. Gilbert was also Colonel Ethan Allen, who commanded the

Biography of Frank Pace

FRANK PACE is one of the youngest, but none the less one of the ablest, attorneys of northwest Arkansas. He has improved every opportunity for gaining knowledge and has availed himself of every chance for the betterment of his condition and reputation, and more than this cannot be said of the most successful man who has ever lived. He owes his nativity to Boone County, Arkansas, born here, he first saw the light July 25, 1871, being a son of the well-known attorney, Capt. W. F. Pace. Frank Pace, after receiving his initiatory training in the public schools of his

Slave Narrative of Miss Adeline Blakeley

Interviewer: Mary D. Hudgins Person Interviewed: Miss Adeline Blakely Age: 87 Home: 101 Rock Street, Fayetteville, Arkansas “Honey, look in the bible to get the date when I was born. We want to have it just right. Yes, here’s the place, read it to me. July 10, 1850? Yes, I remember now, that’s what they’ve always told me. I wanted to be sure, though. I was born in Hickman County, Tenn. and was about a year when they brought me to Arkansas. My mother and her people had been bought by Mr. John P. Parks when they were just children—John

Biography of James L. McCoy

James L. McCoy has for many years been identified with the lumber industry both in Kansas and Arkansas, and manages his extensive interests from his home and headquarters at Coffeyville. Nearly all his active career has been spent in the West and in the early days of Oklahoma he went there as a pioneer and opened a farm. James L. McCoy was born in Atchison County, Missouri, May 21, 1862. Four generations of the McCoys have lived in this country, having come originally from Scotland, and the family were early settlers in the State of Ohio. Mr. McCoy’s grandfather, Andrew

Biography of J. R. Graves, M. D.

Coming to Boynton in 1919, Dr. J. R. Graves has already proven his skill and ability as a physician and surgeon and his practice is assuming large proportions. A native of Arkansas, he was born in Logan county on the 29th of November, 1883, his parents being G. W. and Mary (Suter) Graves, who were also born in that state. The paternal grandfather, Jacob Graves, was a veteran of both the Civil and Mexican wars, having charge of Fort Gibson, Indian Territory, during the latter conflict. He was a charter member of Masonic Lodge, No. 9, at Clarksville, Arkansas, with

Biography of Albert N. Earnest, M. D.

Dr. Albert N. Earnest, a surgeon of Muskogee, is numbered among the native sons of Oklahoma and his record as a successful member of the medical profession stands in contradistinction to the old adage that a prophet is never without honor save in his own country. Dr. Earnest was born near Webbers Falls, in Muskogee county, September 13, 1890, and is a son of J. T. and Ellen (Carlisle) Earnest. The mother is one-fourth Cherokee and was born in Texas, of which state the father is also a native. He came to the Indian Territory when a boy with his