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An Account of the Sufferings of Mercy Harbison – Indian Captivities

On the 4th of November, 1791, a force of Americans under General Arthur St. Clair was attacked, near the present Ohio-Indiana boundary line, by about the same number of Indians led by Blue Jacket, Little Turtle, and the white renegade Simon Girty. Their defeat was the most disastrous that ever has been suffered by our arms when engaged against a savage foe on anything like even terms. Out of 86 officers and about 1400 regular and militia soldiers, St. Clair lost 70 officers killed or wounded, and 845 men killed, wounded, or missing. The survivors fled in panic, throwing away their weapons and accoutrements. Such was “St. Clair’s defeat.”

The utter incompetency of the officers commanding this expedition may be judged from the single fact that a great number of women were allowed to accompany the troops into a wilderness known to be infested with the worst kind of savages. There were about 250 of these women with the “army” on the day of the battle. Of these, 56 were killed on the spot, many being pinned to the earth by stakes driven through their bodies. Few of the others escaped captivity.

After this unprecedented victory, the Indians became more troublesome than ever along the frontier. No settler’s home was safe, and many were destroyed in the year of terror that followed. The awful fate of one of those households is told in the following touching narrative of Mercy Harbison, wife of one of the survivors of St. Clair’s defeat. How two of her little children were slaughtered before her eyes, how she was dragged through the wilderness with a babe at her breast, how cruelly maltreated, and how she finally escaped, barefooted and carrying her infant through days and nights of almost superhuman exertion, she has left record in a deposition before the magistrates at Pittsburgh and in the statement here reprinted.

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Biography of Gerald Francis Wilson

Gerald Francis Wilson. Among the contributing factors to progress and prosperity in Clay County are the newspapers, and in taking them into account the Leader, at Longford, should by no means be overlooked. It is a live, wide-awake, progressive journal becanse such are the characteristics of its able editor and manager, Gerald Francis Wilson, who

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Biographical Sketch of Henry A. Becker

Becker, Henry A.; surgeon; born, Chicago, Ill., March 3, 1870; son of August Becker; educated, West High School; Adelbert, 1891; W. R. U., medicine, 1894; University of Vienna and Berlin, 1896-97; same universities 6 months, 1912; married, Detroit, Mich., Sept. 18, 1901, Miss Laura E. Ferguson; one son, William Nevison Becker, age 9; visiting surgeon

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Life and travels of Colonel James Smith – Indian Captivities

James Smith, pioneer, was born in Franklin county, Pennsylvania, in 1737. When he was eighteen years of age he was captured by the Indians, was adopted into one of their tribes, and lived with them as one of themselves until his escape in 1759. He became a lieutenant under General Bouquet during the expedition against the Ohio Indians in 1764, and was captain of a company of rangers in Lord Dunmore’s War. In 1775 he was promoted to major of militia. He served in the Pennsylvania convention in 1776, and in the assembly in 1776-77. In the latter year he was commissioned colonel in command on the frontiers, and performed distinguished services. Smith moved to Kentucky in 1788. He was a member of the Danville convention, and represented Bourbon county for many years in the legislature. He died in Washington county, Kentucky, in 1812. The following narrative of his experience as member of an Indian tribe is from his own book entitled “Remarkable Adventures in the Life and Travels of Colonel James Smith,” printed at Lexington, Kentucky, in 1799. It affords a striking contrast to the terrible experiences of the other captives whose stories are republished in this book; for he was well treated, and stayed so long with his red captors that he acquired expert knowledge of their arts and customs, and deep insight into their character.

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Biographical Sketch of Tracy W. Guthrie

Guthrie, Tracy W.; manufacturer; born, Chicago, Ill., Feb. 2, 1866; son of Julius C. and Emily A. Tracy Guthrie; educated in Chicago public schools, Chickering Institute, Cincinnati, public schools in Detroit, Mich., and Elmira, N. Y.; married, New Rochelle, N. Y., Feb. 8, 1910, Settal Horn; pres. Continental Coal Co., Columbus, O., 1903-1904; pres. Republic

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The Discovery Of This Continent, it’s Results To The Natives

In the year 1470, there lived in Lisbon, a town in Portugal, a man by the name of Christopher Columbus, who there married Dona Felipa, the daughter of Bartolome Monis De Palestrello, an Italian (then deceased), who had arisen to great celebrity as a navigator. Dona Felipa was the idol of her doting father, and

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Hough Family of New Bedford, Massachusetts

The progenitor in New England of those bearing the family name of Hough was William Hough, son of Edward Hough, of Westchester, in Cheshire, England. This William Hough was known as a house carpenter at Gloucester, Mass., along just prior to the middle of the seventeenth century. He lived at Trynall Cove, where and on Biskie island, opposite, he had land. It is not known that his father came to New England, but it is believed by those who have written of the family that Ann Hough, who died at Gloucester in 1672, aged eighty-five years, was Edward’s widow and the mother of William Hough. The latter was selectman in 1649 and 1650. His departure from Gloucester is spoken of in the latter year, when he joined the migration to New London, Conn., and in that State the family is a numerous one. William Hough married Oct. 28, 1645, Sarah, daughter of Hugh Calkins, and of their ten children the first three were born at Gloucester and the others at New London.

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Pontiac’s War

Early in the eighteenth century the French had commenced extending their influence among the tribes who inhabited the country bordering on the great western lakes. Always more successful than the other European settlers in conciliating the affections of the savages among whom they lived, they had obtained the hearty good will of nations little known

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