Location: Croydon New Hampshire

Biography of Larnard Powers

Larnard Powers, for many years one of the leading farmers and most influential citizens of Cornish, was born at Croydon, N.H., April 20, 1808. His grandparents were Lemuel and Thankful (Leland) Powers, and his parents were Colonel Samuel and Chloe (Cooper) Powers. Colonel Powers was born at Northbridge in 1763, and was a soldier and officer of the Revolution. His family consisted of the following named children: Olive, Obed, Judith, Nancy, Chloe, Samuel, Ara, Lemuel, Solomon, Ithamar, Larnard, and Randilla. Olive, born in 1786, died in 1841, unmarried; Obed, born in 1788, married Cynthia Cummings, and had a family of

Biography of Hubbard Alonzo Barton

Hubbard Alonzo Barton, of Newport, a member of the present firm of editors and publishers of the New Hampshire Argus and Spectator, was born in Croydon, N.H., May 12, 1842, son of Caleb L. and Bethiah (Tuck) Barton. The Bartons are descended from English emigrants who came to the country previous to 1640. They have embraced many who have become distinguished in the learned professions and in other vocations in life. The great-great-grandfather of the subject of this sketch was killed at the battle of Bunker Hill, and he was a near relative of General Barton of Revolutionary fame. The

Biography of Ruel Whitcomb

Ruel Whitcomb, a resident of New London, Merrimack County, for nearly fifty years, was born December 20, 1822, in Newport, N.H., which was also the birthplace of his parents, Parmenas and Rua (Hurd) Whitcomb. His mother was a daughter of Samuel Hurd, a pioneer settler of Newport. His father’s father, Benjamin Whitcomb, removed from Henniker, this county, to Newport at an early period of its settlement. Parmenas Whitcomb was a farmer and lumberman, and helped build a saw mill in his native town, living in Newport until his death, at the age of eighty-five years. His first wife died at

1850 Census of Croydon New Hampshire

The 1850 census of Croydon, Sullivan County, NH was extracted by Dennis Partridge from 7 Jan 2010 through 14 March 2010. The extraction provides basic information such as the names, ages, sex, and occupation of each resident of Croydon. For space purposes and speed, I have chosen not to do a complete extraction, but may choose at a later date to add the full transcription. Every person enumerated in Croydon, however, is listed. For further verification of this census, researchers should view the original census records.

Croydon New Hampshire Miscellany

Casualties in Croydon New Hampshire In 1770 Caleb, son of Seth Chase, the first settler in town, wandered into the forest, and was lost, and public opinion was divided as to the probable fate of the child; some believed that he was captured and carried away by some straggling band of Indians, while others thought that he met his death at the hands of a villainous white man. Isaac Sanger, another early settler, perished in attempting to cross Croydon Mountain. Alexander Metcalf, Jr., was killed by the falling of a tree. Abijah Hall was drowned at Glidden Bridge in 1812.

Everend J. Young Genealogy

Young, Everend J. b. in Croyden, 1850; son of Caleb J. and Eliza (Heath) Young; m (1.) Nora A. Butterfield; m. (2), Nov. 4, 1914, in Keene, by Rev. E. F. Miller, to Mrs. Eunice I. (Rumrill) Howard, b. in Weathersfield, Vt., 1868; dau. of Horace and Lucinda (Randall) Rumrill. Ch.: Harold L.2, b. Washington, N. H.; m. Feb. 28, 1903, in Marlow by Rev. F. O. Tyler of Marlow, to Grace A. Knight, b. in Marlow, Mar., 1883; d. there, Sept. 19, 1914; dau. of Milan A. and Vesta E. (Shelley) Knight. Ch.: Emory E.3, b. June 23, 1903.

History of Croydon, Sullivan County, New Hampshire

Croydon, in Sullivan County, N.H., is situated on the highland between the Connecticut and Merrimack rivers, is bounded on the north by Grantham, east by Springfield and Sunapee, south by Newport, and west by Cornish. Area, twenty-six thousand acres; distance from Concord, the Capital of the State, forty-five miles; from Lebanon, seventeen miles, and from Newport, nearest railroad station, seven miles. Much of its scenery is wild and picturesque. The soil is diversified. That bordering on Sugar River is rich and productive; as we rise gradually back upon the hills it yields excellent grass, wheat and potatoes, while, as we

Civil History of Croydon NH

Town Clerks – The following is a list of town clerks from 1768-1885 inclusive. Moses Whipple, from 1768 to 1772. John Cooper, from 1772 to 1775. Moses Whipple, from 1775 to 1781. From 1781 to 1783, no records. Stephen Powers, from 1783 to 1789. Jesse Green, from 1789 to 1795. Jacob Haven, from 1795 to 1798. Reuben Carroll, from 1798 to 1805. Benjamin Barton, from 1805 to 1806. Reuben Carroll, from 1806 to 1807. Jacob Haven, from 1807 to 1815. Stephen Eastman, from 1815 to 1816. Jacob Haven, from 1816 to 1837. Benjamin Skinner, from 1837 to 1841. Daniel R.

Biography of George William Dunbar

The first known ancestor of the Dunbar family in America was Robert Dunbar, a Scotchman who, circumstances indicate, was one of the Scotch prisoners sent over to the Massachusetts Colony in 1652, by Cromwell after the battles of Dunbar and Worcester. It is certain that this Robert Dunbar was the ancestor of the Dunbars of Abington and Bridgewater, if not of all bearing that name in New England. The family has always shown the characteristics which have so favorably distinguished the Scotch people. They are good, law-abiding citizens, with a frugal thrift and industry, a careful economy, and cautious and

Military History of Croydon NH

Revolutionary War The sympathies of the first settlers of Croydon were early enlisted in the Revolutionary struggle. Soon after the Battle of Lexington, they sent Eleazer Leland and Abner Brigham to join the Provincial army; enrolled a company of twelve minute-men; raised eight pounds to purchase a town supply of ammunition, and chose Moses Whipple, Stephen Powers, Phineas Sanger, Abner Brigham and Joseph Hall a "committee of safety." In 1777 nine men from Croydon joined a company of militia, commanded by Captain Solomon Chase, of Cornish, and marched to Ticonderoga. Eight men joined the company of Captain Hardy, of Hanover,