Location: Colusa County CA

Biography of Fred W. Gooding

Fred W. Gooding, ex-assessor and tax collector of Lincoln County and one of the most prominent and extensive sheep-raisers of this section of the state, was born in England, May 8, 1856, his parents, John and Elizabeth (Wyatte) Gooding being likewise natives of that country. Emigrating to the United States, they took up their residence in Paw Paw, Van Buren County, Michigan, where they still make their home, the father being a retired farmer of that locality. Both he and his wife are members of the Episcopal church. They had six sons and a daughter, and three of the sons

Biography of Samuel F. Newhard

SAMUEL F. NEWHARD. – This venerable and esteemed citizen of Union county and resident of Lagrande is one of the worthy pioneers that hewed a way into the regions of the west and left a trail where others might follow to reap the good and that had been tapped by these hardy and intrepid predecessors. From the first days when he pressed the sod in this county until the present he has been in the vanguard of progress and his efforts have brought many dollars of wealth to the county, and his wise counsels have aided materially in shaping the

Humburg, Ruby E. – Obituary

Enterprise, Wallowa County, Oregon Ruby E. Humburg passed away in Woodlands, California on May 17, 1984. Mrs. Humburg was a former resident of Wallowa County, living in Enterprise from 1969 until moving to Colusa, Calif. in 1982. Mrs. Humburg was born March 27, 1896. She was preceded in death by her husband in 1959. Survivors include one daughter, Delores Preece, of Sun Lakes, Arizona; and two sons, Ralph, of Davis, Calif., and Gene, of Hayward, Calif.; nine grandchildren, fourteen great-grandchildren, and two great-great-grandchildren. Mrs. Humburg was a member of Wallowa Valley Chapter, OES, AARP, Rebkahs, the Time-Out Club, Enterprise Community

Biography of Samuel K. Klinefelter

Samuel K. Klinefelter is the junior member of the firm of Hayt & Klinefelter, the proprietors of the well known Fashion Livery Stables of Riverside. Mr. Klinefelter was born in Richland County, Ohio, June 10, 1845. His parents, Joseph and Elizabeth Klinefelter, were natives of Pennsylvania and were among the early settlers of the county in which he was born. He was reared in his native place until twelve years of age. In 1857 his father moved to Brown County, Kansas and was there engaged in farming occupations until his death in 1858. Mr. Klinefelter was brought up to farm

Biography of Thomas Jefferson Wood

Thomas Jefferson Wood is one of the earliest pioneers of Riverside and has been identified with Riverside city and colony since, and even before, the first soil was turned, or the first nail was driven in the building improvements. In 1870 Mr. Wood was living near San Bernardino, engaged in farming, and also at his trade as a carpenter and builder. In September of that year at the solicitation of Judge North and Dr. Greves he came to the lands now occupied by Riverside and erected the first building ever built upon the Riverside colony lands. This building was the

Patwin Tribe

Patwin Indians (‘man,’ ‘person’). A name adopted by Powers to designate a division of the Copehan family. They occupied the area extending from Stony creek, Colusa County, to Suisun Bay, Solano County, California, and from Sacramento river to the boundary of the Kulanapan family on the west, but excluding the so-called Coyote Valley Indians on the headwaters of Putah creek in the south part of Lake County, determined by Barrett to be Moquelumnan and not Copehan. The dialects of this division differ considerably from those of the Wintun. Powers believed the Patwin were once very numerous. The manners and customs

Pomo Tribe

Pomo Indians, Poma Indians. The name of the Indian linguistic stock, technically known as Kulanapan, living in parts of Sonoma, Lake, Mendocino, Colusa, and Glenn Counties, California. In the northern Pomo dialect Pomo means ‘people,’ and added to a place name forms the name for a group of people. Although Poma is almost as frequently heard as Pomo, the latter has come into general use in both scientific and popular literature. The territory occupied by the Pomo is in two parts: a main area which extends, generally speaking, from west to east, from the coast to the crest of the

Wintun Tribe

Wintun Indians (‘Indians,’ ‘people’). One of the 2 divisions of the Copehan family, the other being the Patwin. The Wintun territory was bounded on the north by Mt Shasta and the domain of the Lutuamian and Shastan families; on the south by a line running from the east boundary, about 10 miles east of Sacramento river, due west through Jacinto and the headwaters of Stony creek, Colusa County, California, to Kulanapan territory. The east boundary began at the headwaters of Bear creek, bearing south some miles east of and parallel to McCloud river. From Pit river to the neighborhood of

Colusa County, California Cemetery Records

Most of these cemetery listings are complete indices at the time of transcription, however, in some cases we list the listing when it is only a partial listing. Cemeteries hosted at Colusa County CAGenWeb Project Cemeteries hosted atColusa County CAGenWeb Archives Colusa County Cemetery Search Cemeteries hosted at Colusa County California USGenWeb Archives Cemetery Inscriptions of Colusa County, California, Vol. 1 Cemetery Inscriptions of Colusa County, California, Vol. 2 Cemetery Inscriptions of Colusa County, California, Vol. 3 Grand Island Cemetery Cemeteries Photos hosted at Colusa County California Transcription Tombstone Project College City Cemeteries Colusa Community Cemetery Holy Cross Catholic Cemetery