Location: Cincinnati Ohio

Biography of James L. Reat, M. D.

James Lee Reat, M. D., one of the most distinguished physicians and surgeons of Illinois, and who has been long and honorably connected with the professional and industrial interests of Douglas County, was born in Fairfield County, Ohio, January 26, 1824. The Reat ancestors are traced back to Scotland, where the name was pronounced in two syllables, with the accent on the last. Two brothers emigrated to this country during the war of the Revolution, one of whom espoused the cause of the rebels, the term by which the patriot colonies were then known, and served through that struggle with

Biography of William Henry Folmsbee

William Henry Folmsbee was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, June 22, 1831. His parents were Isaac and Deborah Folmsbee; his father, who was major in the United States regular army, died when the subject of this sketch had reached the age of seven years, and his mother followed him to the grave “some two years later. Thus thrown upon the world at this early age to provide for himself, he found a kind friend in the person of Dr. William Ensign, who gave him a home, reared and educated him. He attended the common and higher schools of Cincinnati, and while

Biographical Sketch of Joshua W. Alexander

Joshua W. Alexander, only son of Thomas W. and Jane Alexander, was born at Cincinnati, Ohio, January 22, 1852. When he had reached the age of four years, his parents removed to Anoka County, Minnesota, and settled upon a farm. There his father died in 1859, and in 1860 his mother removed to Canton, Lewis County, Missouri, and soon after returned to Cincinnati, where the subject of our sketch attended school until July, 1863, when they once more made Canton their home, and there he attended the graded school until 1868, when he entered the Christian University at Canton, graduating

Spring Grove Cemetery, Cincinnati, Ohio

ALTER Blanche, 1887 – 1947 Elizabeth T., 1882 – 1937 Emma C., 1876 – 1877 Franklin, 1831 – 1916. Wife 1 Mary S. Taylor. Wife 2 Emma Christine Weaver. Franklin Jr., 1869 – 1949 George Taylor, 1871 – 1933 Henry Tice, 1872 – 1914 Mary S. (Taylor), 1843 – 1872. Wife of Franklin Alter. Emma C., 1856 – 1927. Wife of Franklin Alter.

Slave Narrative of Sarah H. Locke

Interviewer: Anna Pritchett Person Interviewed: Sarah H. Locke Location: Indiana Place of Birth: Woodford County, Kentucky Date of Birth: 1859 Federal Writers’ Project of the W.P.A. District #6 Marion County Anna Pritchett 1200 Kentucky Avenue FOLKLORE MRS. SARAH H. LOCKE-DAUGHTER [of Wm. A. and Priscilla Taylor] Mrs. Locke, the daughter of Wm. A. and Priscilla Taylor, was born in Woodford County, Kentucky in 1859. She went over her early days with great interest. Jacob Keephart, her master, was very kind to his slaves, would never sell them to “nigger traders.” His family was very large, so they bought and sold

Biographical Sketch of John P. Hatterscheidt

John P. Hatterscheidt, of Leavenworth County, was a German by birth who came from Cincinnati to Kansas in the spring of 1857. He did much work in the territory as an engineer and surveyor. In 1858 he served as a delegate to the Leavenworth constitutional convention. All the Germans were freesoilers and Hatterscheidt was an acknowledged leader among them. In the spring of 1859 he returned to Cincinnati, where he is reported to have died. Another account of his later years is that he made quite an impression on Abraham Lincoln when he visited Kansas; that when elected President he

Boyd County, Kentucky

BOYD CO. (Carl F. Hall) The Commonwealth of Kentucky, having for a northern boundary the Ohio River-the dividing line between the northern free states and the southern slave states has always been regarded as a southern state. As in the other states of the old south, slavery was an institution until the Thirteenth Ammendment to the Constitution of the United States gave the negro freedom in 1865. Kentucky did not, as other southern states, secede from the Union, but attempted to be neutral during the Civil War. The people, however, were divided in their allegience, furnishing recruits for both the

Slave Narrative of Richard Toler

Interviewer: Ruth Thompson Person Interviewed: Richard Toler Location: Cincinnati, Ohio Place of Residence: 515 Poplar St., Cincinnati, Ohio Occupation: Blacksmith Ruth Thompson, Interviewing Graff, Editing Ex-Slave Interviews Hamilton Co., District 12 Cincinnati RICHARD TOLER 515 Poplar St., Cincinnati, O. “Ah never fit in de wah; no suh, ah couldn’t. Mah belly’s been broke! But ah sho’ did want to, and ah went up to be examined, but they didn’t receive me on account of mah broken stomach. But ah sho’ tried, ’cause ah wanted to be free. Ah didn’t like to be no slave. Dat wasn’t good times.” Richard Toler,

Slave Narrative of Reverend Williams

Interviewer: Miriam Logan Person Interviewed: Rev. Williams Location: Lebanon, Ohio Place of Birth: Greenbriar County, West Virginia Date of Birth: 1859 Age: 76 Occupation: Methodist minister Miriam Logan Lebanon, Ohio July 8th Warren County, District 2 Story of REVEREND WILLIAMS, Aged 76, Colored Methodist Minister, Born Greenbriar County, West Virginia (Born 1859) “I was born on the estate of Miss Frances Cree, my mother’s mistress. She had set my grandmother Delilah free with her sixteen children, so my mother was free when I was born, but my father was not. “My father was butler to General Davis, nephew of Jefferson

Slave Narrative of Charles H. Anderson

Interviewer: Ruth Thompson Person Interviewed: Charles H. Anderson Location: Cincinnati, Ohio Place of Birth: Richmond, Virginia Date of Birth: December 23, 1845 Place of Residence: 3122 Fredonia St., Cincinnati, Ohio Occupation: Handy man “Life experience excels all reading. Every place you go, you learn something from every class of people. Books are just for a memory, to keep history and the like, but I don’t have to go huntin’ in libraries, I got one in my own head, for you can’t forget what you learn from experience.” The old man speaking is a living example of his theory, and, judging