Location: Bowling Township Illinois

Biographical Sketch of Alexander W. Coyne

That farming in Rock Island County is a profitable occupation is attested by the subject of this sketch, who, though in business for himself but a few years, is now the owner of two hundred and sixty acres of well improved land in section eleven, Bowling Township. He was born in the same Township, the son of William and Margaret (Morrison) Coyne, March 15, 1866. After the usual schooling of the country boy and the practical preparation for life on the farm, he married March 27, 1901, Miss Nora S. Doonan, of Mercer County, Illinois. The latter is the daughter

Biographical Sketch of William T. Coyne

William T. Coyne is one of the enterprising and up-to-date agriculturists of Rural Township, Rock Island County, and a member of one of the pioneer families. He is a native son of the County, having been born in Bowling Township June 16, 1861. He is a son of William and Margaret (Morrison) Coyne. Born on the farm, he has always followed that vocation. With a limited schooling he, by study and close observation, has gained through his own efforts a ready fund of general information, as well as a good working capital of special knowledge of use to him in

Biographical Sketch of James Coyne

The man whose name appears at the head of this sketch is known as one of the most industrious and enterprising farmers of Bowling Township, where he was born and has spent all his life. He first opened his eyes upon this world November 19, 1867, his parents being William and Margaret (Morrison) Coyne. He attended the public schools of the County, and February 18, 1896, was married to Miss Eilza A. Bauer. The latter is also a native of Bowling. She was born September 3, 1869, the daughter of Jacob and Mary (McDonald) Bauer. Her mother was a native

Biography of William Coyne, Senior

Rock Island County owes much to its Irish sons. They have tilled its soil, built up, developed and directed its industries, and are today among its most substantial and energetic citizens. In no case is the obligation more real than in that of William Coyne, senior, “Uncle Billy,” as he is popularly known. He was one of the earliest comers to this locality from Erin’s Isle, and after more than sixty-two years residence here is still a man of remarkable activity. He has been one of the county’s heaviest land holders, and though he has turned the greater portion of

Biography of Robert E. Little

Robert E. Little, for ten years postmaster of the Village of Milan, is one of the successful native sons of the County. He was born on a farm in Bowling Township May 22, 1861. His parents, William and Elizabeth (Rea) Little, were both of Irish birth, the former’s natal day being December 7, 1815, and the latter’s August 16, 1819. They were married in their native land and immigrated to America and to Rock Island County in 1844. The farm on which they settled and which they occupied till death was entered by them from the Government. Mr. Little passed

Biographical Sketch of Francis Coyne

One of the prosperous young farmers of Rock Island County is Francis Coyne, son of William and Margaret (Morrison) Coyne. He was born in Bowling Township, where he now resides, March 8, 1876. He received a common school education in the County and started out for himself in 1902, following his marriage, when he established himself on the old homestead. In the Fall of 1904 he removed to the farm he now occupies. He now owns two hundred and twenty acres of well improved land and is considered one of the well-to-do and substantial citizens of the County. Mr. Coyne’s

Biographical Sketch of Edward S. Coyne

A well known native son of Rock Island County is Edward S. Coyne, son of William and Margaret (Morrison) Coyne. He was born on the old homestead in Bowling Township, on which he now resides, October 25, 1873. Tilling the soil has been his sole occupation. In the Spring of 1896, he settled on one of his father’s farms in section eleven, Bowling, where he resided till the Spring of 1900. Then he removed to the farm he now occupies in section one, same township. He now owns two hundred and sixty acres of good land, which he cultivates with