Boston Massachusetts

Biographical Sketch of Hiram C. Ellenwood

Hiram C. Ellenwood, a carpenter and undertaker of Charlestown, N.H., was born in Woodward, Vt., November 26, 1826, son of Cyrus and Sally (Draper) Ellenwood. His grandfather, Joseph Ellenwood, was a native of Greenfield, N.H., where he also resided during the greater part of his life, engaged in general farming. He married Mary Punchard, who …

Biographical Sketch of Hiram C. Ellenwood Read More »

Genealogy of the Whitney Family of New Bedford, Massachusetts

The Whitney family of New Bedford, of which the late Amasa Whitney, one of the well known citizens of that place, was a worthy member, is one of the oldest and best known of the early families of America. Its members in every generation here from the Colonial ancestor have been noted for high attainments, vigorous intellect and the qualities which make for influential citizenship. Notable among the descendants of John Whitney, the emigrant ancestor, are Eli Whitney, whose fame as the inventor of the cotton gin and no less in other lines has won a place in the hall of fame; the late William Collins Whitney, lawyer and politician, famous as corporation counsel of New York City and secretary of war, 1885-89; and Henry M. Whitney, of Boston – illustrious names Which have added to the glory of their country as well as to the fame of an honored race.

Ancestry of William H. Nelson of Plymouth, Massachusetts

Nelson Genealogy William Nelson, an early comer to Plymouth, before 1636, had land granted him Aug. 3, 1640, and was among those able to bear arms in 1643. He was juryman in 1648. He was probably among the first settlers of Middleboro, although it is impossible to state when he went from Plymouth to Middleboro, …

Ancestry of William H. Nelson of Plymouth, Massachusetts Read More »

Ancestors of John Jay Whipple of Brockton, Massachusetts

For nearly fifty years the name of Whipple has been one of Brockton citizenship, representing a family here of substance and exceptional prominence in the community. Reference is made to the late Ferdinand Whipple and his son, the present Hon. John Jay Whipple, who together and in turn have been among Brockton’s successful business men, the son having figured conspicuously in public affairs, filling most of the offices within the gift of his fellow citizens, among other honors having been four times elected to the mayoralty of the city of Brockton. The Whipple family is one long prominent in the country, the earlier generations having been conspicuous in Rhode Island’s Colonial period, it being a Rhode Island family.

Genealogy of the Spare Family of New Bedford Massachusetts

SPARE (New Bedford family). For upward of half a century the old Spare family of Boston-Canton has been represented in New Bedford citizenship, professionally and in business life, by the late John Spare, M. D., a man of liberal education, surgeon in the United States navy during the Civil war, etc., followed by his son, John V. Spare, who has for long years been one of the most enterprising and successful merchants of the city, as well as substantial citizens. The family history and genealogy of this branch of the Spare family follows, given in chronological order from the immigrant settler.

Howland Family of Dartmouth and New Bedford, Massachusetts

Henry Howland, the progenitor of the Ancient Dartmouth Howland family, the branch here specially considered, lived at Duxbury. The first mention of him in New England is that made in the allotment of cattle to the different families in Plymouth in 1624. Perhaps none of the colonists has a better record for intelligence, thrift, uprightness and unmixed faith in the Divine One than Henry Howland, and these virtues have permeated the lives of his posterity. In general they are a family of great respectability, and as a people thrifty, economical and good managers of finance, most of them having a fair share of this world’s goods – some amassing millions. Henry Howland was made a freeman in 1633; was chosen constable for Duxbury in 1635; bought land there in 1640; was for some years surveyor of highways; served repeatedly on the grand jury, etc. He joined the Society of Friends, perhaps in 1657, and was not a little persecuted thereafter on this account. In 1652, associated with others, he bought a large tract of land in Dartmouth; was one of the twenty-seven purchasers of what is now Freetown in 1659, and in the division of 1660 he received for his share the sixth lot, which was afterward inherited by his son Samuel Howland. He was one of the grantees of Bridgewater but never lived there. Mr. Howland married Mary Newland, and both likely died at the old homestead in Duxbury.

Pin It on Pinterest

Scroll to Top