Location: Berkeley County SC

Slave Narrative of Ned Walker

Interviewer: W. W. Dixon Person Interviewed: Ned Walker Location: Winnsboro, South Carolina Place of Birth: Winnsboro, South Carolina Age: 83 Ned Walker lives in the village of White Oak, near Winnsboro, S.C., in a two-room frame house, the dwelling of his son-in-law, Leander Heath, who married his daughter, Nora. Ned is too old to do any work of a remunerative character but looks after the garden and chickens of his daughter and son-in-law. He is a frequent visitor to Winnsboro, S.C. He brings chickens and garden produce, to sell in the town and the Winnsboro Hill’s village. He is tall, thin, and

Sewee Indians

Sewee Tribe: Significance: perhaps, as Gatschet suggested, from sawe’, “island.” Sewee Connections. No words of their language have survived, but the Sewee are regarded as Siouan on strong circumstantial grounds, in spite of the fact that they are sometimes classed with the Cusabo. Sewee Location. On the lower course of Santee River and the coast westward to the divide of the of Ashley River about the present Monks Corner, Berkeley County, SC. Sewee Villages. Lawson, writing about 1700, mentions a deserted village in Sewee Bay called Avendaughbough which may have belonged to them (Lawson, 1860). The name seems to be

Biography of Gillis Q. Lake

Gillis Q. Lake has been in the drug business at Kansas City, Kansas, for the past eighteen years. Most of the people of that city know how he had built up the two finest drug stores in Kansas City, Kansas. The druggist is both a professional and business man, and Mr. Lake had apparently been equally strong in the professional and practical side of his business career. He was born at Wooster in Wayne County, Ohio, August 14, 1863. His parents were Constant and Ann (McDonald) Lake, the former a native of Ohio and the latter of Charleston, South Carolina.

Sewee Tribe

Sewee Indians. A small tribe, supposedly Siouan, formerly living in east South Carolina. According to Rivers they occupied the lower part of Santee river and the coast westward to the divide of Ashley river, about the present Monks Corner, Berkeley County, where they adjoined the Etiwaw.

The Sewee, Santee, Wateree, and Congaree Indians

The Santee and its branches, the Wateree and the Congaree, were held by the Sewee, Santee, Wateree, and Congaree tribes, whose territory extended to the neighborhood of the Waxhaw and Catawba. Nothing is known of their linguistic affinities, but their alliances and final incorporation were with the Catawba. Sewee Indians The Sewee occupied the coast and the lower part of the river below the Santee, extending westward to the divide of Ashley river about the present Monks Corner, in Berkeley county, South Carolina, where they adjoined the Etiwaw 1Rivers, W. J. A Sketch of the history of South Carolina to

Berkeley County, South Carolina Census Records

Berkeley County, South Carolina was formed from Charleston County in 1882. 1890 Berkeley County, South Carolina Census Free 1890 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial  1890 Veterans Schedule $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems $ Hosted at Census Guide 1890 U.S. Census Guide 1900 Berkeley County, South Carolina Census Free 1900 Census Form for your Research Free 1900 Census Images and Index Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial  1900 Berkeley County, Census (images and index) $ Hosted at Census Guide 1900 U.S. Census Guide 1910 Berkeley County, South Carolina Census Free 1910 Census Form