Location: Alberta Canada

Wilcox, Electa Margaret – Obituary

Enterprise, Oregon Mrs. J. R. Wilcox Laid To Rest Funeral services were held at the Catholic church in Enterprise Wednesday at 10 a.m. for Mrs. J.R. Wilcox, who passed away at the Enterprise hospital April 4, 1943. Burial was in the family lot in the local cemetery by the side of a son who died many years ago. Electa Margaret Coffen was born December 24, 1878, in Iowa. In October 1898, she was united in marriage to Joseph Ruel Wilcox. The first two years of their married life were spent in Minneapolis, Minn. In 1901 they moved to Alberta, Canada,

Paul, Jean Eliza Schnebly – Obituary

Native Ellensburg resident Jean E. Paul, 95, died Wednesday [November 3, 1982] at Gold Leaf Nursing Home where she had lived for the past seven years. She was born Feb. 14, 1887-a daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. P. H. Schnebly. She attended local schools, Ellensburg Normal School and obtained a registered nursing degree from Good Samaritan Hospital in Portland, Ore. She and John H. Paul were married in Ellensburg on Sept. 3, 1912. Except for seven years, when they homesteaded in Alberta, Canada, the couple made their home in the Ellensburg area, Mr. Paul died May 19, 1975.

Kainah Tribe

Kainah First Nation, Kainah Indians, Blood Indians (Ah-kai-nah, ‘many chiefs,’ from a-kai-im many , ni´-nah chiefs ). A division of the Siksika, or Blackfeet, now living on a reservation under the Blood agency in Alberta, Canada, between Belly and St Mary Rivers. The subtribes or bands are Ahkaiksumiks, Ahkaipokaks, Ahkptashiks, Ahkwonistsists, Anepo, Apikaiyiks, Aputpsikainah, Inuhksoyistamiks, Isisokasimiks, Istsikainah, Mameoya, Nitikskiks, Saksinahmahyiks, Siksahpuniks, and Siksinokaks. According to the Report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs for 1858, there were then 300 tipis and 2,400 persons. In 1904 there were 1,196 persons on the reservation, of whom 958 were classed as pagans. Alternate

Siksika Tribe

Siksika Indians. A tribe of the Siksika confederacy (see below). They now (1905) live on a reservation in Alberta, Canada, on upper Bow River, and are officially known as the Running Rabbit and Yellow Horse bands. They were divided into the following subtribes or bands: Aisikstukiks, Apikaiyiks, Emi-tahpahksaiyiks, Motahtosiks, Puhksinahmahyiks, Saiyiks, Siksinokaks,Tsiniktsistsoyiks. Pop. 942 in 1902, 795 in 1909. Siksika Confederacy Siksika Confederacy, (‘black feet’, from siksinam ‘black’, ka the root of ogkatsh ‘foot’. The origin of the name is disputed, but it is commonly believed to have reference to the discoloring of their moccasins by the ashes of the

Shoshonean Indians

Shoshonean Family, Shoshonean People, Shoshonean Nation. The extent of country occupied renders this one of the most important of the linguistic families of the North American Indians. The area held by Shoshonean tribes, exceeded by the territory of only two families – the Algonquian and the Athapascan, – may thus be described: On the north the south west part of Montana, the whole of Idaho south of about lat. 45° 30′, with south east Oregon, south of the Blue Mountains, west and central Wyoming, west and central Colorado, with a strip of north New Mexico; east New Mexico and the

Blackfeet Tribe

Blackfeet Indians, Siksika Tribe, Siksika Indians (‘black feet’, from siksinam ‘black’, ka the root of oqkatsh, ‘foot’. The origin of the name is disputed, but it is commonly believed to have reference to the discoloring of their moccasins by the ashes of the prairie fires; it may possibly have reference to black-painted moccasins such as were worn by the Pawnee, Sihasapa, and other tribes). An important Algonquian confederacy of the northern plains, consisting of three subtribes, the Siksika proper or Blackfeet, the Kainah or Bloods, and the Piegan, the whole body being popularly known as Blackfeet. In close alliance with