The Fugitive Slave Law

American Anti-Slavery Society. The Fugitive Slave Law, and its Victims. New York: American Anti-Slavery Society. 1856.

The Fugitive Slave Law

The Fugitive Slave Law was enacted by Congress in September, 1850. It declared that all runaway slaves were, upon capture, to be returned to their masters. In effect, encouraging local officials to “kidnap” suspected slaves, detain them, and transport them back to Southern States and their “owners”. This collection provides a synopsis of the act itself, and specific, named examples of it’s effect on Blacks living in the North.

Synopsis of the Law – Fugitive Slave Law

Section 1. United States Commissioners “authorized and required to exercise and discharge all the powers and duties conferred by this act.” Section. 2. Commissioners for the Territories to be appointed by the Superior Court of the same. Section. 3. United States Circuit Courts, and Superior Courts of Territories, required to enlarge the number of Commissioners, …

Synopsis of the Law – Fugitive Slave Law Read More »

More Victims of Anti-Slavery Act – Fugitive Slave Law

Columbia, Penn., (end of March, 1852;) a colored man, named William Smith, was arrested as a fugitive slave in the lumber yard of Mr. Gottlieb, by Deputy Marshal Snyder, of Harrisburg, and police officer Ridgeley, of Baltimore, under a warrant from Commissioner McAllister. Smith endeavored to escape, when Ridgeley drew a pistol and shot him …

More Victims of Anti-Slavery Act – Fugitive Slave Law Read More »

Margaret Garner and Seven Others – Fugitive Slave Law

Of this recent and peculiarly painful case we give a somewhat detailed account, mainly taken from the Cincinnati papers of the day. About ten o’clock on Sunday, 27th January, 1856, a party of eight slaves – —two men, two women, and four children— – belonging to Archibald K. Gaines and John Marshall, of Richwood Station, …

Margaret Garner and Seven Others – Fugitive Slave Law Read More »

Pin It on Pinterest

Scroll to Top