Missionary work among the Ojibway Indians

Wilson, Rev. Edward F. Missionary Work Among the Ojebway Indians. London: Society For Promoting Christian Knowledge. 1886.

The Winter Of 1874-5.

By the time winter set in, the walls of the new Shingwauk Home were erected and the roof on, but beyond this nothing could be done until spring. However, we could not wait for the new building to be completed before re-organizing our work. The two frame cottages, already mentioned, had been finished and furnished, …

The Winter Of 1874-5. Read More »

The Wawanosh Home.

The spot selected for the Wawanosh Home was rather more than a mile above the village of Saulght five acres of bush land at three pounds an acre as a site for the wawanosh home ten-acre cultivated lot, just opposite, for L60. Immediately after making the purchase, we took all our boys up there for a …

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The Bishop’s Visit.

We were now well settled into our Indian home at Sarnia and my work was clearly defined. The Sarnia Reserve was our head-quarters. Here there were some 400 Indians, and at Kettle Point, thirty miles away, were about 100 more. The out-stations were to be New Credit, Saugeen, and Cape Croker, which places together contained …

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Runaway Boys.

One day three boys were missing; nobody could tell what had become of them; the bush was scoured, the roads searched, and messengers despatched to the Sault to try and gain some clue to their whereabouts. After a time it was discovered that some bread and other things were missing, and it became clear that …

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Roughing It.

We expected that when we got to Garden River we should find an empty house, and have to do everything for ourselves; so we came well provided with a supply of flour, salt meat, etc., etc. Quite a crowd of Indians came running down to the dock when we landed, and all were eager to …

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Prospects Of Re-Building.

“Shingwauk–an announcement!” Such was the heading of a communication which appeared in the correspondence columns of the “Church Herald” in the Spring of 1874, between four and five months after our fire,–and it ran thus: “A little more than four months ago the Shingwauk Industrial Home at Garden River was burnt to the ground, and …

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Missionary Work Among the Ojibway Indians

The largest freshwater lake in the world is Lake Superior, through the centre of which runs the boundary line between the United States of America and the Dominion of Canada. The Indians call it the “Ojebway Kecheguramee,” that is–literally translated–the Great water of the Ojebways, or as they are often called the Chippeways. The Ojebways …

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