Indian Tribes of North America

Swanton, John R. The Indian Tribes of North America. Bureau of American Ethnology, Bulletin 145. Washington DC: US Government Printing Office. 1953.

Linguistic Families of American Indians North of Mexico

Swanton’s The Indian Tribes of North America is a classic example of early 20th Century Native American ethnological research. Published in 1953 in Bulletin 145 of the Bureau of American Ethnology, this manuscript covers all known Indian tribes broken down by location (state). AccessGenealogy’s online presentation provides state pages by which the user is then either provided a brief history of the tribe, or is referred to a more in-depth ethnological representation of the tribe and it’s place in history. This ethnology usually contains the various names by which the tribe was known, general locations of the tribe, village names, brief history, population statistics for the tribe, and then connections in which the tribe is noted.

Yavapai Indians

Yavapai Indians. According to the Handbook of American Indians (Hodge, 1907, 1910), from enyaéva, “sun,” and pai, “people,” and thus signifying “people of the sun,” but the southeastern Yavapai interpreted it to mean “crooked-mouth people,” that is, a “sulky” people who do not agree with other peoples (fide Gifford, 1936). Also called: Apache Mohaves, in …

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Papago Indians

Papago Indians. Signifying “bean people,” from the native words paphh, “beans,” and  óotam, “people.” Also called: Saikinne, Si’-ke-na, Apache name for Pima, Papago, and Maricopa. Táh’ba, Yavapai name. Teχpamais, Maricopa name. Tóno-oōhtam, own name, signifying “people of the desert.” Vidshi itikapa, Tonto name. Papago Connections The Papago belong to the Piman branch of the Uto-Aztecan …

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Clatsop Indians

Clatsop Indians. The Clatsop centered about Cape Adams, on the south side of Columbia River, extending up the latter as far as Tongue Point and southward on the Pacific coast to Tillamook Head.

Clatskanie Indians

Clatskanie Indians. According to Gibbs (1877) the Clatskanie at one time owned the prairies bordering Chehalis River, Washington, at the mouth of Skookumchuck River, but on the failure of game, crossed the Columbia and occupied the mountains about Clatskanie River, their best-known historic seat. For a long time they exacted toll of all who passed going up or down the Columbia.

Chastacosta Indians

Chastacosta Indians were located on the lower course of Illinois River, both sides of Rogue River for some distance above its confluence with the Illinois, and on the north bank somewhat farther in Oregon.

Atfalati Indians

Atfalati Indians were located on the Atfalati plains, the hills about Forest Grove and the shores and vicinity of Wapato; they are also said to have extended as far as the site of Portland, all in the present state of Oregon.

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