Biography of John C. Ralphs

John C. Ralphs, of San Bernardino, was born in Utah in 1852, while his parents were on their way to California. His father, Richard Ralphs, and his mother, Mary (Newal) Ralphs, were both born in England. His father was a potter and also a bricklayer by trade, and made the brick for the Los Angeles jail, also that in the old Workman property, after coming to California. He wintered once in Salt Lake City, and in 1852 he crossed the plains by ox team to California and bought seven acres of land, on which he built a cabin; this was before the land was surveyed. He then bought fifty-seven acres in American District; then forty acres more in the same district, and engaged extensively in general farming and stock raising. He next bought 135 acres adjoining the original fifty-seven acres, and several lots. He had ‘a family of eight children, five boys and three girls, one of whom died on the way to California. He died September 15, 1874, and his wife April 22, 1887.

John C. Ralphs, the subject of this sketch, received but a limited education, and made a hand on the farm from the time he was ten years old. He first bought a claim on the Santa Ana River, remained there fifteen years and then lost the claim. Then he bought twelve acres in American District, and has since added 100 acres to the original twelve acres. Seven years ago he built a fine residence on Mill street and Mount Vernon avenue, southeast of San Bernardino city. In 1882 he was married to Miss Eunice Roberts, daughter of John Roberts, a pioneer of this valley. They have seven children, viz.: Mary Angeline, Martha, Richard, George, Ida Belle, Charles B. and John. Mr. Ralphs has made his own way in the world and is highly respected by all who know him.


Surnames:
Ralphs,

Topics:
Biography,

Collection:
The Lewis Publishing Company. An Illustrated History of Southern California embracing the counties of San Diego San Bernardino Los Angeles and Orange and the peninsula of lower California. The Lewis Publishing Company, Chicago, Illinois. 1890.

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