Topic: Kansa

Treaty of March 13, 1862

Whereas a treaty was made and concluded at the Kansas agency, in the then Territory, but now State, of Kansas, on the fifth day of October, A. D. 1859, by and between Alfred B. Greenwood, commissioner on the part of the United States, and the chiefs and head-men representing the Kansas tribe of Indians, and authorized by said tribe for that purpose; which treaty, after having been submitted to the Senate of the United States for its constitutional action thereon, was duly accepted, ratified, and confirmed by the President of the United States, on the seventeenth day of November, A.

Treaty of October 5, 1859

Articles of agreement and convention made and concluded at the Kansas agency, in the Territory of Kansas, on the fifth day of October, eighteen hundred and fifty-nine, by and between Alfred B. Greenwood, commissioner, on the part of the United States, and the following-named chiefs and headmen representing the Kansas tribe of Indians, to wit: Ke-hi-ga-wah Chuffe, Ish-tal-a-sa, Ne-hoo-ja-in-gah, Ki-hi-ga-wat-te-in-gah, Ki-he-gah-cha, Al-li-ca-wah-ho, Pah-hous-ga-tun-gah, Ke-hah-lah-la-hu, Ki-ha-gah-chu, Ee-le-sun-gah, Wah-pah-jah, Ko-sah-mun-gee, Oo-ga-shama, Wah-Shumga, Wah-ti-inga, Wah-e-la-ga, Pa-ha-ne-ga-la, Pa-ta-go, Cahulle, Ma-she-tum, Wa-no-ba-ga-ha, She-ga-wa-sa, Ma-his-pa-wa-cha, Ma-shon-o-pusha, Ja-ha-sha-watanga, Ki-he-ga-tussa, and Ka-la-sha-wat-lumga, they being thereto duly authorized by said tribe. Article 1. The Kansas Indians having now more

Treaty of June 3, 1825

Articles of a treaty made and concluded at the City of Saint Louis, in the State of Missouri, between William Clark, Superintendent of Indian Affairs, Commissioner on the part of the United States of America, and the undersigned Chiefs, Head Men, and Warriors of the Kansas Nation of Indians, duly authorized and empowered by said Nation. Article 1. The Kansas do hereby cede to the United States all the lands lying within the State of Missouri, to which the said nation have title or claim; and do further cede and relinquish, to the said United States, all other lands which

Treaty of August 16, 1825

Whereas the Congress of the United States of America being anxious to promote a direct commercial and friendly intercourse between the citizens of the United States and those of the Mexican Republic, and, to afford protection to the same, did, at their last session, pass an act, which was approved the 3d of March, 1825, “to authorize the President of the United States to cause a road to be marked out from the Western frontier of Missouri to the confines of New Mexico,” and which authorizes the President of the United States to appoint Commissioners to carry said act of

Treaty of October 28, 1815

A treaty of peace and friendship, made and concluded at St. Louis between Ninian Edwards and Auguste Chouteau, Commissioners Plenipotentiary of the United States of America, on the part and behalf of the said States, of one part; and the undersigned Chiefs and Warriors of the Kanzas Tribe of Indians, on the part and behalf of their said Tribe, of the other part. The parties being desirous of re-establishing peace and friendship between the United States and their said tribe, and of being placed, in all things, and in every respect, upon the same footing upon which they stood before

Treaty of January 14, 1846

Articles of a treaty made and concluded at the Methodist Mission, in the Kansas country, between Thomas H. Harvey and Richard W. Cummins, commissioners of the United States, and the Kansas tribe of Indians. Article 1. The Kansas tribe of Indians cede to the United States two millions of acres of land on the east part of their country, embracing the entire width, thirty miles, and running west for quantity. Article 2. In consideration of the foregoing cession, the United States agree to pay to the Kansas Indians two hundred and two thousand dollars, two hundred thousand of which shall

Kansa Indians

The Kansas Indians were located usually on some part of the Kansas River, which derives its name from them.

Kansa Habitation

Houses of the Kansa Tribe

To quote from the Handbook: “Their linguistic relations are closest with the Osage, and are close with the Quapaw. In the traditional migration of the group, after the Quapaw had first separated there from, the main body divided at the mouth of Osage River, the Osage moving up that stream and the Omaha and Ponca crossing Missouri River and proceeding northward, while the Kansa ascended the Missouri on the south side to the mouth of Kansa River. Here a brief halt was made, after which they ascended the Missouri on the, south side until they reached the present north boundary

Inchi

Inchi (In′tci, ‘stone lodge’). A village occupied by the Kansa in their migration up Kansas River. J. O. Dorsey, inf’n, 1882. 1Hodge, Handbook of American Indians, 604, 1905. Footnotes:   [ + ] 1. ↩ Hodge, Handbook of American Indians, 604, 1905.

Kansa Indian Gentes

The Kansa gentes as given by Dorsey (15th Rep. B. A. E., 230, 1897) are: Manyinka (earth lodge) Ta (deer) Panka (Ponca) Kanze (Kansa) Wasabe (black bear) Wanaghe (ghost) Kekin (carries a turtle on his hack) Minkin (carries the sun on his back) Upan (elk) Khuva (white eagle) Han (night) lbache (holds the firebrand to sacred pipes) Hangatanga (large Hanga) Chedunga (buffalo bull) Chizhuwashtage (Chizhu peacemaker) Lunikashinga (thunder being people) These gentes constitute 7 phratries.