Topic: Flathead

Second supplemental order

On the relation of the United States, by Henry B. Carrington, its agent and attorney for certain Flathead Indians-Before district court of Missoula County, Mont. It appearing that Henry B. Carrington, relater on behalf of the United States respecting guardians for minor heirs of certain Flathead Indians, has filed a second certificate, such was directed by order of this court in such case provided, showing the designation and action of Chief Carlos Victor of said tribe of Indians, as guardian of his minor son Victor, the grandson of Widow Pallicino, by his first wife Margarite, since deceased, it is ordered

Second certificate supplemental to order of court

On the relation of the United States, by Henry B. Carrington, agent, attorney, etc;-in the district court, Missoula county.- Pursuant to an order of court entered December 7, 1889, I do hereby certify that Chief Carlos Victor, of the Flathead tribe of Indians, the grandfather of Victor, minor son of said Charles Victor, by Margret Pallicino, only daughter of widow Pallicino, a Flathead Indian patentee, deceased, has acted as guardian of said minor and executed his consent to the sale of the lands patented to the grandmother aforesaid, the mother of said Victor having also deceased. HENRY B. CARRINGTON, Agent

Certificate supplemental to order of court

On the relation of the United States, by Henry B. Carrington, agent, attorney, etc.,-on the district court, Missoula County. Pursuant to an order of court entered December 7, 1889, touching guardians for certain Indians theretofore appointed and thereafter to be appointed, I do hereby certify that Rev. J. D’Aste, of St. Ignaius Mission, by virtue of said order, has acted as guardian for Moses and Narcisse (Delaware minor children of Delaware Jim, deceased), as a guardian of Anna, John, and Julia Curren, grandchildren of Widow Maltius, and Indian allotee of Indian land, deceased; also as guardian of Louis, who also

June 5, 1872 Act

Chapter 308 June 5, 1872. 17 Stat., 226. An act to provide for the removal of the Flathead and other Indians from the Bitter-Root Valley, in the Territory of Montana. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That it shall be the duty of the President, as soon as practicable, to remove the Flathead Indians, (whether of full or mixed bloods,) and all other Indians connected with said tribe, and recognized as members thereof, from Bitter-Root Valley, in the Territory of Montana, to the general reservation in said

Feb. 11, 1874 Act

Chapter 25 Feb. 11, 1874. 18 Stat., 15. An act to amend the act entitled “An act to provide for the removal of the Flathead and other Indians from the Bitter-Root Valley, in the Territory of Montana,” approved June fifth, eighteen hundred and seventy-two. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the time of sale and payment of pre-empted lands in the Bitter-Root Valley, in the Territory of Montana, is hereby extended for the period of two years from the expiration of the time allotted in the

Mar. 2, 1889 Act

An act to provide for the sale of lands patented to certain members of the Flathead band of Indians in Montana Territory, and for other purposes. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the Secretary of the Interior, with the consent of the Indians severally, to whom patents have been issued for lands assigned to them in the Bitter Root Valley, in Montana Territory, under the provisions of an act of Congress approved June fifth, eighteen hundred and seventy-two, entitled “An act to provide for the removal

List of those Signing Consents

In 1890 the United States removed the Flathead Indians from the Bitter Root Valley to the Jocko Reservation in Montana. The Flatheads who gave their consent to the release of the Flathead lands are listed in this document. List of those Signing Consents. 1. Widow Therese Brooks, Joseph Brooks (son), for self and as guardian for Cornelius Brooks and Louis Brooks. Louis Brooks for himself when found to be of age. Sophie Brooks Murengo (married daughter). 2. Joseph Colluyer. Signed. 3. Widow Mary Mouchelle. Signed. Antoine Monchelle, only son also signed. 4. Medicine Pere. Rosaline (widow) signed. Sophie (only child)

July 1, 1898 Act

Chapter 545 July 1, 1898. 30 Stat., 571. An act making appropriations for the current and contingent expenses of the Indian Department and for fulfilling treaty stipulations with various Indian tribes for the fiscal year ending June thirtieth, eighteen hundred and ninety-nine, and for other purposes. SEC. 9 That with the consent of the Indians, severally, the Secretary of the Interior is hereby authorized to cause a reappraisement of the unsold tracts of land of the Flathead Indians, situated in the Bitter Root Valley, Montana, by such person connected with the Indian service as he may designate, and that such

Flathead Indians of Bitter Root Valley Montana

Extracts from Senate Executive Document #231 of the 51st Congress, 1st Session concerning Flathead Indian Allotments in Montana, 1889. In 1890 the United States removed the Flathead Indians from the Bitter Root Valley to the Jocko Reservation in Montana. The Indians who gave their consent to the release of the Flathead lands are listed in this document along with the relating acts and supporting documents that we have found. The Bitter Root Valley Lands These lands lie in nine different townships, the extreme tracts being 24 miles apart. The allotters had the privilege either to accept the land so diminished

Flathead Tribe

Flathead. A name applied to several different tribes usually owing to the fact that they were accustomed to flatten the heads of their children artificially. In S. E. United States the Catawba and Choctaw were sometimes designated by the term Flatheads, and the custom extended to nearly all Muskhogean tribes as well as to the Natchez and the Tonika. In the N. W. the Chinook of Columbia River, many of the Vancouver Island Indians, and most of the Salish of Puget Sound and British Columbia were addicted to the practice, and the term has been applied to all as a