Topic: Eno

Eno Indians

Eno Tribe: Significance unknown, but Speck suggests i’nare, “to dislike,” whence “mean,” “comptemptible”; yeni’nare, “People disliked,”  Haynokes, synonym form Yardley (1645) Eno Connections. The Eno were probably of the Siouan linguistic stock, though, on account of certain peculiarities attributed to them, Mooney (1895) casts some doubt upon this. Their nearest relatives were the Shakori. Eno Location. On Eno River in the present Orange and Durham Counties. (See also South Carolina.) Eno Villages. The only village name recorded, distinct from that of the tribe, is Adshusheer, a town which they shared with the Shakori. It is located by Mooney (1928) near

Eno Tribe

Eno Indians. A tribe associated with the Adshusheer and Shakori in North Carolina in the 17th century.  Mooney thinks it doubtful that the Eno and the Shakori where of Siouan stock, as they seem to have differed in physique and habits from their neighbors, although their alliances were all with Siouan tribes. Little is known of them as they disappeared from history as tribal bodies about 1720, having been incorporated with the Catawba on the south or with the Saponi and their confederates on the north, although they still retained their distinct dialect in 1743. The Eno and Shakori are