Topic: Acolapissa

Acolapissa Indians

Acolapissa Tribe: Meaning “those who listen and see,” indicating possibly “borderers” or “scouts.” Also called: Aquelou pissas, by Le Page du Pratz (1758, 2: 219). Cenepisa, by La Salle (in Margry, 1875-86,1: 564). Colapissas, in 1699 by Penicaut (in French, 1869, p. 38). Coulapissas, in 1700 by Sauvole (in Margry 1875-86, 4: 462). Equinipichas, by Sauvole (in French, 1851, 3: 225). Kinipissa, by Tonti (in Margry, 1875-86; 1: 604). Kolapissas, in 1700 by Gravier (in French, 1875, p. 88). Acolapissa Connections. The Acolapissa belonged to the Muskhogean linguistic family and evidently spoke a language closely related to Choctaw and Chickasaw.

Tangipahoa Tribe

Tangipahoa Indians (from tandshi,’maize’; apa, ‘stalk,’ ‘cob’; ava, ‘to gather’: ‘those who gather maize stalks or cobs.’ Wright. Pénicat explains the river name Tandgepao erroneously as ‘white wheat or corn’ ). An extinct tribe, supposed to be Muskhogean, formerly living on the lower Mississippi and on Tangipahoa river, which flows south into Lake Pontchartrain, south east Louisiana. Tonti mentions this people as residing, in 1682, on the Mississippi, 12 leagues from the. Quinipissa village; but, according to Iberville 1Iberville, Margry, Dec., iv, 168, 1880, the Bayogoula informed him that the Tangipahoa had never lived on the Mississippi; nevertheless both statements

Acolapissa Tribe

Acolapissa Indians. An tribe, of Choctaw lineage, formerly living on Lake Ponchartrain, about the coast lagoons, and on the Mississippi, in Louisiana.