Surname: Durham

Contributions of the Lowell Historical Society

Contributions of the Lowell Massachusetts Historical Society

The Lowell Historical Society of Lowell Massachusetts published 2 volumes of “contributions” to the recording of the history of Lowell Massachusetts at the turn of the century. These contributions were preceded by the contributions by the Old Residents Historical Association of Lowell, Massachusetts. Table of Contents Volume I Bunker Hill, The Battle of, and Those Who Participated Therein from the Towns from which Lowell was Formed, Mrs. Sara Swan Griffin Fiske, Rev. John, by Henry S. Perham Francis, Mrs. Sarah W., by Miss Mabel Hill Lincoln, Abraham, Centennial Anniversary of Introductory Address, Solon W. Stevens Recollections of Lincoln in Lowell

Cleveland County North Carolina Colored Apprentices

A list of Colored Apprentices that have been indentured in the County Court of Cleveland County since May 1866 Underage children who were not or could not be supported by their parents or were orphans were apprenticed by Freedmen’s Bureau officials to persons who would be responsible for their upbringing and welfare. North Carolina Cleveland County I hereby certify that the foregoing is a true list contains the names of all colored children that have been indentured by the County Court for the County aforesaid. S. Williams, Clk. Per M. F. Williams, D. C. D. Whisnant Chm. County Court [Box]Source:

Slave Narrative of Bill Williams

Interviewer: W. W. Dixon Person Interviewed: Bill Williams Location: Winnsboro, South Carolina Age: 82 Bill Williams lives on the Durham place, nine miles east of Winnsboro, S.C., on the warm charity of Mr. Arthur M. Owens, the present owner. He is decrepit and unable to work. “I was born a slave of old Marster John Durham, on a plantation ’bout five miles east of Blackstock, S.C. My mistress name Margaret. Deir chillun was Miss Cynthia, Marse Johnnie, Marse Willie and Marse Charnel. I forgits de others. Then, when young Marse Johnnie marry Miss Minnie Mobley, my mammy, Kizzie, my daddy,

Slave Narrative of Tempie Herndon Durham

Interviewer: Travis Jordan Person Interviewed: Tempie Herndon Durham Location: 1312 Pine St., Durham, North Carolina Age: 103 I was thirty-one years ole when de surrender come. Dat makes me sho nuff ole. Near ’bout a hundred an’ three years done passed over dis here white head of mine. I’se been here, I mean I’se been here. ‘Spects I’se de olest nigger in Durham. I’se been here so long dat I done forgot near ’bout as much as dese here new generation niggers knows or ever gwine know. My white fo’ks lived in Chatham County. Dey was Marse George an’ Mis’

Biography of Col. Charles William Durham

Col. Charles William Durham is the principal assistant in the engineering office at Rock Island Arsenal. His father, Charles Durham, was born in Belfast, Maine; his mother, Dorcas C. Durham, was born in the town of Brewer of the same State. Mr. Durham, senior, was for the greater part of his life a lumber merchant and vessel owner. Both parents are now dead. Young Charles was a graduate of Chelsea (Massachusetts) High School in 1864, and graduated Bachelor of Arts from Harvard College in 1868. Thence he went to Germany and studied in Heidelberg University for one year, returning to